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The Effect of Family Background on Student Effort

  • Zöe Kuehn
  • Pedro Landeras

In this paper, we propose an intuitive way of how to measure residential segregation. Individuals are located in different nodes on a network that are interconnected through links. Each period, an individual either advances to an adjacent node or she stops moving. In this setting, the segregation index is then defined as the probability that a randomly chosen individual meets an individual of the same social group in the neighborhood where her random-walk terminates. It is shown in a dual theorem that the segregation index is as a natural generalization of the isolation index to networks and that it is proportional to the PageRank index applied by Google in order to determine the importance of web-pages. Finally, the segregation index is applied to the Spanish 2009 census tract data and compared with other prominent measures.

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File URL: http://documentos.fedea.net/pubs/dt/2010/dt-2010-31.pdf
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Paper provided by FEDEA in its series Working Papers with number 2010-31.

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Date of creation: Nov 2010
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Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2010-31
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.fedea.net

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  1. Fernando Galindo-Rueda & Anna Vignoles, 2003. "Class Ridden or Meritocratic? An Economic Analysis of Recent Changes in Britain," CEE Discussion Papers 0032, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  2. Jo Blanden & Paul Gregg, 2004. "Family Income and Educational Attainment: A Review of Approaches and Evidence for Britain," CEE Discussion Papers 0041, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  3. Pedro Landeras, 2009. "Student effort: standards vs. tournaments," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(9), pages 965-969.
  4. Belzil, Christian & Leonardi, Marco, 2007. "Can risk aversion explain schooling attainments? Evidence from Italy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(6), pages 957-970, December.
  5. Christian Belzil & Jörgen Hansen, 2004. "Earnings Dispersion, Risk Aversion and Education," Post-Print halshs-00180125, HAL.
  6. Gianni de Fraja, 2002. "The Design of Optimal Education Policies," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(2), pages 437-466.
  7. Todd R. Stinebrickner & Ralph Stinebrickner, 2007. "The Causal Effect of Studying on Academic Performance," University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity Working Papers 20072, University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity.
  8. Gianni De Fraja & Tania Oliveira & Luisa Zanchi, 2010. "Must Try Harder: Evaluating the Role of Effort in Educational Attainment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(3), pages 577-597, August.
  9. Gianni De Fraja & Pedro Landeras, . "Could Do Better: The Effectiveness of Incentives and Competition in Schools," Discussion Papers 02/11, Department of Economics, University of York.
  10. Gianni De Fraja, 2003. "Reverse Discrimination and Efficiency in Education," CEIS Research Paper 38, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
  11. Brindusa Anghel & Antonio Cabrales, 2010. "The Determinants of Success in Primary Education in Spain," Working Papers 2010-20, FEDEA.
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