IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pic7.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Amy Ickowitz

Personal Details

First Name:Amy
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ickowitz
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pic7
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Center for International Forestry Research

http://www.cifor.org/
Bogor, Indonesia

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Ickowitz, Amy & Powell, Bronwen & Salim, Mohammad & Sunderland, Terry, 2013. "Dietary quality and tree cover in Africa," MPRA Paper 52906, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Ickowitz, Amy, 2012. "Wealthiest Is Not Always Healthiest: What Explains Differences in Child Mortality in West Africa?," MPRA Paper 52905, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Ickowitz, Amy, 2011. "Shifting cultivation and forest pressure in Cameroon," MPRA Paper 53077, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Ickowitz, Amy & Sills, Erin & de Sassi, Claudio, 2017. "Estimating Smallholder Opportunity Costs of REDD+: A Pantropical Analysis from Households to Carbon and Back," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 15-26.
  2. Amy Ickowitz & Lisa Mohanty, 2015. "Why Would She? Polygyny and Women's Welfare in Ghana," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 77-104, April.
  3. Sunderland, Terry & Achdiawan, Ramadhani & Angelsen, Arild & Babigumira, Ronnie & Ickowitz, Amy & Paumgarten, Fiona & Reyes-García, Victoria & Shively, Gerald, 2014. "Challenging Perceptions about Men, Women, and Forest Product Use: A Global Comparative Study," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(S1), pages 56-66.
  4. Barbara Vinceti & Céline Termote & Amy Ickowitz & Bronwen Powell & Katja Kehlenbeck & Danny Hunter, 2013. "The Contribution of Forests and Trees to Sustainable Diets," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(11), pages 1-28, November.
  5. Amy Ickowitz, 2012. "Wealthiest Is Not Always Healthiest: What Explains Differences in Child Mortality in West Africa?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(2), pages 192-227, March.
  6. Amy Ickowitz, 2011. "Shifting cultivation and forest pressure in Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 42(2), pages 207-220, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Ickowitz, Amy & Powell, Bronwen & Salim, Mohammad & Sunderland, Terry, 2013. "Dietary quality and tree cover in Africa," MPRA Paper 52906, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Gudrun B. Keding & Katja Kehlenbeck & Gina Kennedy & Stepha McMullin, 2017. "Fruit production and consumption: practices, preferences and attitudes of women in rural western Kenya," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(3), pages 453-469, June.

  2. Ickowitz, Amy, 2012. "Wealthiest Is Not Always Healthiest: What Explains Differences in Child Mortality in West Africa?," MPRA Paper 52905, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Pérez-Moreno, Salvador & Blanco-Arana, María C. & Bárcena-Martín, Elena, 2016. "Economic cycles and child mortality: A cross-national study of the least developed countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 14-23.

  3. Ickowitz, Amy, 2011. "Shifting cultivation and forest pressure in Cameroon," MPRA Paper 53077, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Hettig, Elisabeth & Lay, Jann & Sipangule, Kacana, 2015. "Drivers of households' land-use decisions - A critical review of micro-level studies in tropical regions," EFForTS Discussion Paper Series 15, University of Goettingen, Collaborative Research Centre 990 "EFForTS, Ecological and Socioeconomic Functions of Tropical Lowland Rainforest Transformation Systems (Sumatra, Indonesia)".

Articles

  1. Amy Ickowitz & Lisa Mohanty, 2015. "Why Would She? Polygyny and Women's Welfare in Ghana," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 77-104, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Elisabeth Cudeville & Charlotte Guénard & Anne-Sophie Robilliard, 2017. "Polygamy and female labour supply in Senegal," WIDER Working Paper Series 127, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  2. Sunderland, Terry & Achdiawan, Ramadhani & Angelsen, Arild & Babigumira, Ronnie & Ickowitz, Amy & Paumgarten, Fiona & Reyes-García, Victoria & Shively, Gerald, 2014. "Challenging Perceptions about Men, Women, and Forest Product Use: A Global Comparative Study," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(S1), pages 56-66.

    Cited by:

    1. Shrestha, Sujata & Shrestha, Uttam Babu, 2017. "Beyond money: Does REDD+ payment enhance household's participation in forest governance and management in Nepal's community forests?," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 63-70.
    2. Kiran Asher & Annie Shattuck, 2017. "Forests and Food Security: What’s Gender Got to Do with It?," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-16, March.
    3. Wunder, Sven & Angelsen, Arild & Belcher, Brian, 2014. "Forests, Livelihoods, and Conservation: Broadening the Empirical Base," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(S1), pages 1-11.
    4. Nystad Handberg , Øyvind & Angelsen, Arild, 2016. "Pay little, get little; pay more, get a little more: A framed forest experiment in Tanzania," Working Paper Series 02-2016, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, School of Economics and Business.
    5. Mbatu, Richard S, 2016. "REDD+ research: Reviewing the literature, limitations and ways forward," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 140-152.

  3. Barbara Vinceti & Céline Termote & Amy Ickowitz & Bronwen Powell & Katja Kehlenbeck & Danny Hunter, 2013. "The Contribution of Forests and Trees to Sustainable Diets," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(11), pages 1-28, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Reyes-García, Victoria & Menendez-Baceta, Gorka & Aceituno-Mata, Laura & Acosta-Naranjo, Rufino & Calvet-Mir, Laura & Domínguez, Pablo & Garnatje, Teresa & Gómez-Baggethun, Erik & Molina-Bustamante, M, 2015. "From famine foods to delicatessen: Interpreting trends in the use of wild edible plants through cultural ecosystem services," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 303-311.
    2. Lauren Q. Sneyd, 2013. "Wild Food, Prices, Diets and Development: Sustainability and Food Security in Urban Cameroon," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(11), pages 1-32, November.
    3. Kiran Asher & Annie Shattuck, 2017. "Forests and Food Security: What’s Gender Got to Do with It?," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-16, March.
    4. Gudrun B. Keding & Katja Kehlenbeck & Gina Kennedy & Stepha McMullin, 2017. "Fruit production and consumption: practices, preferences and attitudes of women in rural western Kenya," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(3), pages 453-469, June.
    5. Yaoqi Zhang & Wei Geng & Yueqin Shen & Yanling Wang & Yu-Cheng Dai, 2014. "Edible Mushroom Cultivation for Food Security and Rural Development in China: Bio-Innovation, Technological Dissemination and Marketing," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(5), pages 1-13, May.
    6. Hickey, Gordon M. & Pouliot, Mariève & Smith-Hall, Carsten & Wunder, Sven & Nielsen, Martin R., 2016. "Quantifying the economic contribution of wild food harvests to rural livelihoods: A global-comparative analysis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 122-132.
    7. Ickowitz, Amy & Powell, Bronwen & Salim, Mohammad & Sunderland, Terry, 2013. "Dietary quality and tree cover in Africa," MPRA Paper 52906, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Amy Ickowitz, 2012. "Wealthiest Is Not Always Healthiest: What Explains Differences in Child Mortality in West Africa?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(2), pages 192-227, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Amy Ickowitz, 2011. "Shifting cultivation and forest pressure in Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 42(2), pages 207-220, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Amy Ickowitz should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.