IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jsusta/v12y2020i20p8407-d426954.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

From Multidisciplinarity to Transdisciplinarity and from Local to Global Foci: Integrative Approaches to Systemic Resilience Based upon the Value of Life in the Context of Environmental and Gender Vulnerabilities with a Special Focus upon the Brazilian Amazon Biome

Author

Listed:
  • Anastasia Zabaniotou

    (Biomass Group, Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece)

  • Christine Syrgiannis

    (Group of Studies and Research on Interdisciplinarity, Futures and Spirituality, Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05014-901, Brazil)

  • Daniela Gasperin

    (Group of Studies and Research on Futures, Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05014-901, Brazil)

  • Arnoldo José de Hoyos Guevera

    (School of Management, Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05014-901, Brazil)

  • Ivani Fazenda

    (Educational Program-Interdisciplinarity, Leader of the Group of Studies and Research on Interdisciplinarity—GEPI, Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05014-901, Brazil)

  • Donald Huisingh

    (The Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA)

Abstract

Economic and environmental interventions in the Anthropocene have created disruptions that are threatening the capacity of socio-ecological systems to recover from adversities and to be able to maintain key functions for preserving resilience. The authors of this paper underscore the benefits of a workshop-based methodology for developing a vision and an approach to the inner processes of creation that can be used to increase resilience, to cope with societal vulnerabilities and to develop the tools for future planning at local, regional and global scales. Diverse areas of discourse ranging from climate science and sustainability, to psychoanalysis, linguistics and eco-philosophy, contributed meaningfully to the transdisciplinary approach for enhancing resilience. A framework is proposed that can be used throughout society, that integrates the importance of human subjectivity and the variability of human contexts, especially gender, in shaping human experiences and responses to climate change impacts and challenges such as the covid-19 pandemic. Within the domain of socio-economic research, the authors challenge researchers and policy makers to expand future perspectives of resilience through the proposed systemic resilience vision. Movement towards transformative thinking and actions requires inner exploration and visualization of desirable futures for integrating ecological, social, cultural, ethical, and economic dimensions as agencies for catalyzing the transition to livable, sustainable, equitable, ethical, and resilient societies.

Suggested Citation

  • Anastasia Zabaniotou & Christine Syrgiannis & Daniela Gasperin & Arnoldo José de Hoyos Guevera & Ivani Fazenda & Donald Huisingh, 2020. "From Multidisciplinarity to Transdisciplinarity and from Local to Global Foci: Integrative Approaches to Systemic Resilience Based upon the Value of Life in the Context of Environmental and Gender Vul," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(20), pages 1-32, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:12:y:2020:i:20:p:8407-:d:426954
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/12/20/8407/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/12/20/8407/
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Júlia Alves Menezes & Ulisses Confalonieri & Ana Paula Madureira & Isabela de Brito Duval & Rhavena Barbosa dos Santos & Carina Margonari, 2018. "Mapping human vulnerability to climate change in the Brazilian Amazon: The construction of a municipal vulnerability index," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(2), pages 1-30, February.
    2. Matin, Nilufar & Forrester, John & Ensor, Jonathan, 2018. "What is equitable resilience?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 197-205.
    3. Forsyth, Tim, 2018. "Is resilience to climate change socially inclusive? Investigating theories of change processes in Myanmar," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 13-26.
    4. Sunderland, Terry & Achdiawan, Ramadhani & Angelsen, Arild & Babigumira, Ronnie & Ickowitz, Amy & Paumgarten, Fiona & Reyes-García, Victoria & Shively, Gerald, 2014. "Challenging Perceptions about Men, Women, and Forest Product Use: A Global Comparative Study," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(S1), pages 56-66.
    5. Clark, Colin W. & Kirkwood, Geoffrey P., 1986. "On uncertain renewable resource stocks: Optimal harvest policies and the value of stock surveys," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 235-244, September.
    6. Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino Cerri & Carlos Clemente Cerri & Stoécio Malta Ferreira Maia & Maurício Roberto Cherubin & Brigitte Josefine Feigl & Rattan Lal, 2018. "Reducing Amazon Deforestation through Agricultural Intensification in the Cerrado for Advancing Food Security and Mitigating Climate Change," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(4), pages 1-18, March.
    7. Cammelli, Federico & Angelsen, Arild, 2019. "Amazonian farmers' response to fire policies and climate change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 1-1.
    8. Caviglia-Harris, Jill L., 2018. "Agricultural innovation and climate change policy in the Brazilian Amazon: Intensification practices and the derived demand for pasture," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 232-248.
    9. Blackman, Allen & Veit, Peter, 2018. "Titled Amazon Indigenous Communities Cut Forest Carbon Emissions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 56-67.
    10. Meine van Noordwijk & Vincent Gitz & Peter A. Minang & Sonya Dewi & Beria Leimona & Lalisa Duguma & Nathanaël Pingault & Alexandre Meybeck, 2020. "People-Centric Nature-Based Land Restoration through Agroforestry: A Typology," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(8), pages 1-29, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Anastasia Zabaniotou & Anastasia Pritsa & E-A Kyriakou, 2021. "Observational Evidence of the Need for Gender-Sensitive Approaches to Wildfires Locally and Globally: Case Study of 2018 Wildfire in Mati, Greece," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(3), pages 1-25, February.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Eriksen, Siri & Schipper, E. Lisa F. & Scoville-Simonds, Morgan & Vincent, Katharine & Adam, Hans Nicolai & Brooks, Nick & Harding, Brian & Khatri, Dil & Lenaerts, Lutgart & Liverman, Diana & Mills-No, 2021. "Adaptation interventions and their effect on vulnerability in developing countries: Help, hindrance or irrelevance?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 141(C).
    2. Knippenberg, Erwin & Jensen, Nathaniel & Constas, Mark, 2019. "Quantifying household resilience with high frequency data: Temporal dynamics and methodological options," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 1-15.
    3. Carr, Edward R., 2019. "Properties and projects: Reconciling resilience and transformation for adaptation and development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 70-84.
    4. do Val, J.B.R. & Guillotreau, P. & Vallée, T., 2019. "Fishery management under poorly known dynamics," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 279(1), pages 242-257.
    5. Busby, Joshua & Smith, Todd G. & Krishnan, Nisha & Wight, Charles & Vallejo-Gutierrez, Santiago, 2018. "In harm's way: Climate security vulnerability in Asia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 88-118.
    6. Mugido, Worship & Shackleton, Charlie M., 2019. "The contribution of NTFPS to rural livelihoods in different agro-ecological zones of South Africa," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C).
    7. Carmenta, Rachel & Cammelli, Federico & Dressler, Wolfram & Verbicaro, Camila & Zaehringer, Julie G., 2021. "Between a rock and a hard place: The burdens of uncontrolled fire for smallholders across the tropics," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 145(C).
    8. José Da Rocha & María Gutiérrez, 2012. "Endogenous Fishery Management in a Stochastic Model: Why Do Fishery Agencies Use TACs Along with Fishing Periods?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 53(1), pages 25-59, September.
    9. Schipper, E.L.F. & Tanner, T. & Dube, O.P. & Adams, K.M. & Huq, S., 2020. "The debate: Is global development adapting to climate change?," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 18(C).
    10. Da Rocha, José María & Gutiérrez Huerta, María José, 2010. "Endogenous fisheries management in a stochastic model: Why do fishery agencies use TAC," DFAEII Working Papers 2010-13, University of the Basque Country - Department of Foundations of Economic Analysis II.
    11. Singh, Rajesh & Weninger, Quinn & Doyle, Matthew, 2006. "Fisheries management with stock growth uncertainty and costly capital adjustment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 582-599, September.
    12. Shyamsundar, Priya & Ahlroth, Sofia & Kristjanson, Patricia & Onder, Stefanie, 2020. "Supporting pathways to prosperity in forest landscapes – A PRIME framework," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 125(C).
    13. Ute Kapaun & Martin Quaas, 2013. "Does the Optimal Size of a Fish Stock Increase with Environmental Uncertainties?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 54(2), pages 293-310, February.
    14. Bierkamp, Sina & Nguyen, Trung Thanh & Grote, Ulrike, 2021. "Environmental income and remittances: Evidence from rural central highlands of Vietnam," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 179(C).
    15. Carson, Richard T & Murray, Jason H., 2012. "Fisheries Management Implications of Intrinsic Under Identification of Growth Equation Parameters," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt8bw0b76s, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    16. Debora Sotto & Arlindo Philippi & Tan Yigitcanlar & Md Kamruzzaman, 2019. "Aligning Urban Policy with Climate Action in the Global South: Are Brazilian Cities Considering Climate Emergency in Local Planning Practice?," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(18), pages 1-31, September.
    17. Sethi, Gautam & Costello, Christopher & Fisher, Anthony & Hanemann, Michael & Karp, Larry, 2005. "Fishery management under multiple uncertainty," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 300-318, September.
    18. Wunder, Sven & Angelsen, Arild & Belcher, Brian, 2014. "Forests, Livelihoods, and Conservation: Broadening the Empirical Base," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(S1), pages 1-11.
    19. Handberg, Øyvind Nystad & Angelsen, Arild, 2019. "Pay little, get little; pay more, get a little more: A framed forest experiment in Tanzania," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 454-467.
    20. Costello, Christopher & Quérou, Nicolas & Tomini, Agnes, 2015. "Partial enclosure of the commons," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 69-78.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:12:y:2020:i:20:p:8407-:d:426954. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.mdpi.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: MDPI Indexing Manager (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.mdpi.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.