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Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified tomatoes

Author

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  • James O. Bukenya

    (Department of Agribusiness, Alabama AAM University, P.O. Box 1042, Normal, AL 35762)

  • Natasha R. Wright

    (Department of Agribusiness, Alabama AAM University, P.O. Box 1042, Normal, AL 35762)

Abstract

Although some insights have been gained from previous studies on the acceptability of genetically modified (GM) foods, not many attempts have been made to understand consumer acceptability of genetically modified tomatoes. The purpose of this study is to understand the impact of factors such as consumer knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes on the acceptability of genetically modified tomatoes. The analysis draws on data from a consumer survey conducted at several grocery stores in Alabama in 2003. The results revealed a diversified set of preferences toward GM tomatoes. Logit results suggest that attitude toward the use of genetic modification technology in food production, opinion about labeling, and consumer perceptions about the safety of GM foods strongly influence consumers' decisions. The utility advantage of purchasing non-GM tomatoes corresponds to an average premium of $0.39 per pound, implying that consumers would be willing to purchase non-GM tomatoes at a price $0.39 higher than the price of GM tomatoes. [JEL: O140, Q160, Q180, 110]. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Agribusiness 23: 117-130, 2007.

Suggested Citation

  • James O. Bukenya & Natasha R. Wright, 2007. "Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified tomatoes," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(1), pages 117-130.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:23:y:2007:i:1:p:117-130
    DOI: 10.1002/agr.20109
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sheldon, Ian M. & Josling, Timothy E., 2002. "Biotechnology Regulations And The Wto," Working Papers 14594, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
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    6. Grimsrud, Kristine M. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Loureiro, Maria L. & Wahl, Thomas I., 2002. "Consumer Attitudes Towards Genetically Modified Foods In Norway," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19818, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    Cited by:

    1. Damien Rousselière & Samira Rousselière, 2010. "On the impact of trust on consumer willingness to purchase GM food:Evidence from a European survey," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 91(1), pages 5-26.
    2. He, Na & Bernard, John C., 2011. "Differences in WTP and Consumer Demand for Organic and Non-GM Fresh and Processed Foods," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(2), August.
    3. Yang, Tongyang & Ames, Glenn C.W. & Berning, Joshua, 2015. "Determinants of Consumer Attitudes and Purchasing Behaviors on Genetically Modified Foods in Taiwan," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 46(1), March.
    4. Dannenberg, Astrid, 2009. "The dispersion and development of consumer preferences for genetically modified food -- A meta-analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(8-9), pages 2182-2192, June.

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