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Probit analysis of fresh meat consumption in Belgium: Exploring BSE and television communication impact

Author

Listed:
  • Wim Verbeke

    (University of Ghent, Department Agricultural Economics, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent, Belgium)

  • Ronald W. Ward

    (University of Florida, Food and Resource Economics, 1125 McCarty Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-0240)

  • Jacques Viaene

    (University of Ghent, Department Agricultural Economics, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent, Belgium)

Abstract

This article focuses on factors influencing consumer decision making toward fresh meat consumption in Belgium. Discrete choice models are specified for explaining consumer decisions to decrease fresh meat consumption since the BSE-crisis and toward to the future. Demographic consumer characteristics, consumption frequency and attention to television coverage are included as explanatory variables in the models. A major focus is the impact of television, which has carried several negative reports about meat safety during recent years. Television coverage is found to have a highly negative impact on decision making toward fresh red meat consumption. Model estimation and computation of predicted probabilities reveal that the likelihood of cutting fresh meat consumption increases with greater attention given to television messages, as well as with the presence of young children in the household and with increasing age of the consumer. Interaction between attention to television and age reveals that younger people's decisions are more susceptive to media coverage. Heavy meat consumers are least likely to cut fresh meat consumption. Findings include implications for future livestock production and communication by the meat industry. [Econ-Lit citations: D120, L660, M390] © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Suggested Citation

  • Wim Verbeke & Ronald W. Ward & Jacques Viaene, 2000. "Probit analysis of fresh meat consumption in Belgium: Exploring BSE and television communication impact," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 215-234.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:16:y:2000:i:2:p:215-234
    DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1520-6297(200021)16:2<215::AID-AGR6>3.0.CO;2-S
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:69:y:2017:i:c:p:145-153 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Julie A. Caswell & Siny Joseph, 2007. "Consumer Demand for Quality: Major Determinant for Agricultural and Food Trade in the Future?," Food Marketing Policy Center Research Reports 097, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.
    3. Takashi Ishida & Noriko Ishikawa & Mototsugu Fukushige, 2010. "Impact of BSE and bird flu on consumers' meat demand in Japan," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 49-56.
    4. Donatella Baiardi & Riccardo Puglisi & Simona Scabrosetti, 2012. "Individual Attitudes on Food Quality and Safety: Empirical Evidence on EU Countries," DEM Working Papers Series 014, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    5. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:4:y:2008:i:15:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Caputo, Vincenzina & Aprile, Maria Carmela & Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr., 2011. "Consumers’ Valuation for European food quality labels: Importance of Label Information Provision," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114324, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Verbeke, Wim & Ward, Ronald W., 2001. "A fresh meat almost ideal demand system incorporating negative TV press and advertising impact," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(2-3), September.
    8. Mazzocchi, Mario & Stefani, Gianluca, 2002. "Consumer Welfare and the Loss Induced by Withheld Information: The Case of BSE in Italy," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24927, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Zhang, Xu & Goddard, Ellen W., 2010. "Analysis of Value-Added Meat Product Choice Behaviour by Canadian Households," Project Report Series 99703, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
    10. Fred A. Yamoah & David E. Yawson, 2014. "Assessing Supermarket Food Shopper Reaction to Horsemeat Scandal in the UK," International Review of Management and Marketing, Econjournals, vol. 4(2), pages 98-107.
    11. Edgardo Ayala & Joana Chapa, 2017. "AH1N1 impact on the Mexican pork meat market," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 32(1), pages 3-25.
    12. Vigani, Mauro & Olper, Alessandro, 2013. "GMO standards, endogenous policy and the market for information," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 32-43.
    13. Jill J. McCluskey & Kristine M. Grimsrud & Hiromi Ouchi & Thomas I. Wahl, 2005. "Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Japan: consumers' food safety perceptions and willingness to pay for tested beef ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 49(2), pages 197-209, June.
    14. Ward, Ronald W. & Ferrara, Oscar, 2005. "Measuring Brand Preferences Among U.S. Meat Consumers with Probit Models," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19462, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    15. Wiegerinck, V.J.J., 2006. "Consumer trust and food safety. An attributional approach to food safety incidents and channel response," Other publications TiSEM 6853c430-a9ce-434f-8d45-b, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    16. Martin Browning & Lars Gårn Hansen & Sinne Smed, 2013. "Rational inattention or rational overreaction? Consumer reactions to health news," IFRO Working Paper 2013/14, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    17. Verbeke, W. & Ward, R. W. & Avermaete, T., 2002. "Evaluation of publicity measures relating to the EU beef labelling system in Belgium," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 339-353, August.
    18. Vidyahwati Tenrisanna & Mohammad Mafizur Rahman & Rasheda Khanam, 2016. "Factors Affecting Consumers' Willingness to Pay for Imported Offal in Indonesia: A Case Study for Makassar City," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 15(2), pages 145-159, December.
    19. Farrell, Terence C., 2001. "Modelling Meat Quality Attributes," 2001 Conference (45th), January 23-25, 2001, Adelaide 125624, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

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