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Advertising, Information, and Product Quality: The Case of Butter

Author

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  • Hui-Shung Chang
  • Henry W. Kinnucan

Abstract

This study examines the roles of cholesterol information and advertising in explaining consumption trends for fats and oils, focusing on butter. Results suggest increased consumer awareness of the health effects of blood cholesterol has contributed to the secular decline in butter consumption in Canada. Although consumers' responses to negative information appear to outweigh their responses to positive information, the industry advertising campaign launched in 1978 by the Dairy Bureau of Canada has had a positive effect on butter demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Hui-Shung Chang & Henry W. Kinnucan, 1991. "Advertising, Information, and Product Quality: The Case of Butter," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 73(4), pages 1195-1203.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:73:y:1991:i:4:p:1195-1203.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1242447
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cavaggioni, Margherita & Goddard, Ellen & Funk, Thomas & Taylor, Daphne, 1994. "The Effect of Nutritional Information on Attitude and Consumption of Butter," Department of Agricultural Economics and Business 258816, University of Guelph.
    2. Veeman, Michele M. & Peng, Yanning, 1997. "Canadian Dairy Demand," Project Report Series 24037, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
    3. Hattori, Keisuke & Higashida, Keisaku, 2014. "Misleading advertising and minimum quality standards," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 1-14.
    4. Islam Hassouneh & Teresa Serra & José M. Gil, 2010. "Price transmission in the Spanish bovine sector: the BSE effect," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 33-42, January.
    5. Yadavalli, Anita & Jones, Keithly, 2014. "Does media influence consumer demand? The case of lean finely textured beef in the United States," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 219-227.
    6. Rieger, Jörg & Kuhlgatz, Christian & Anders, Sven, 2016. "Food scandals, media attention and habit persistence among desensitised meat consumers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 82-92.
    7. Elina Lampi, 2011. "What do friends and the media tell us? How different information channels affect women's risk perceptions of age-related female infertility," Journal of Risk Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 365-380, March.
    8. Mario F. Teisl & Nancy E. Bockstael & Alan Levy, 2001. "Measuring the Welfare Effects of Nutrition Information," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 133-149.
    9. repec:oup:ajagec:v:101:y:2019:i:2:p:579-599. is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Richard J. Vyn & Getu Hailu, 2015. "Discount Usage and Price Discrimination for Pork Products in Canada," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 63(4), pages 449-474, December.
    11. M. P. McCullough & T. L. Marsh & R. Huffaker, 2013. "Reconstructing market reactions to consumption harms," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 173-179, February.
    12. Jie‐Min Lee & Sheng‐Hung Chen & Hsiang‐Hsi Liu & Jung‐Yao Hung & Mei‐Yun Huang, 2010. "Effects Of Health Risk Information On Addictive Goods Consumption: A Case Of Tobacco, Alcohol, And Betel Nuts In Taiwan," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(3), pages 406-413, July.
    13. Murali Adhikari & Laxmi Paudel & Krishna Paudel & Jack Houston & James Bukenya, 2007. "Impact of low carbohydrate information on vegetable demands in the United States," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(13), pages 939-944.
    14. Sven Anders & Anke Mőser, 2010. "Consumer Choice and Health: The Importance of Health Attributes for Retail Meat Demand in Canada," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 58(2), pages 249-271, June.

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