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Human Capital Spillovers in Families: Do Parents Learn from or Lean on Their Children?

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  • Ilyana Kuziemko

Abstract

I model how children's acquisition of a given form of human capital incentivizes adults in their household to either learn from them (if children can teach the skill to adults, adults' cost of learning falls) or lean on them (if children's human capital substitutes for that of adults in household production, adults' benefit from learning falls). Using variation in compliance with an English-immersion mandate in California schools, I find that English instruction improved immigrant children's English proficiency but discouraged adults living with them from acquiring the language. Whether family members "learn" or "lean" affects the externalities associated with education policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Ilyana Kuziemko, 2014. "Human Capital Spillovers in Families: Do Parents Learn from or Lean on Their Children?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 755-786.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/677231
    DOI: 10.1086/677231
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Javier Ortega & Gregory Verdugo, 2015. "Assimilation in multilingual cities," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(3), pages 785-815, July.
    2. repec:eee:jhecon:v:58:y:2018:i:c:p:76-89 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Di Paolo, Antonio, 2018. "Bilingual schooling and earnings: Evidence from a language-in-education reform," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 90-101.
    4. Caminal, Ramon & Cappellari, Lorenzo & Di Paolo, Antonio, 2018. "Linguistic Skills and the Intergenerational Transmission of Language," IZA Discussion Papers 11793, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Rodrigo Belo & Pedro Ferreira & Rahul Telang, 2016. "Spillovers from Wiring Schools with Broadband: The Critical Role of Children," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 62(12), pages 3450-3471, December.
    6. Everding, Jakob, 2019. "Heterogeneous spillover effects of children's education on parental mental health," hche Research Papers 2019/18, University of Hamburg, Hamburg Center for Health Economics (hche).
    7. Aimee Chin, 2015. "Impact of bilingual education on student achievement," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 131-131, March.
    8. repec:eee:jhecon:v:57:y:2018:i:c:p:206-220 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Lundborg, Petter & Majlesi, Kaveh, 2018. "Intergenerational transmission of human capital: Is it a one-way street?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 206-220.
    10. repec:eee:socmed:v:183:y:2017:i:c:p:56-61 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:33:y:2019:i:c:p:101-115 is not listed on IDEAS

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