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Gender occupational segregation and its impact on the gender wage differential among rural-urban migrants: a Chinese case study

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  • Xin Meng

Abstract

Since the late 1980s, massive rural - urban migration in China has attracted considerable attention from economists and policymakers, both within and outside China. One of the most striking features of rural - urban migration is that job attainment among the migrants differs considerably between males and females. It is of great interest to know the reasons for this difference and, more importantly, whether gender occupational segregation has a large impact on the gender wage differential among migrants. This paper examines these issues using data on 1504 migrants collected in Jinan city, Shandong province. It is found that gender occupational segregation in this sector is mainly due to the unequal treatment of male and female attributes in occupational assignment and that this contributes very significantly to the gender wage differential among migrants. A comparison with another study on China's rural industrial labour market is made, which suggest that intra-occupational gender wage discrimination is lower in the labour market for rural - urban migrants than in the labour market in the rural industrial sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Xin Meng, 1998. "Gender occupational segregation and its impact on the gender wage differential among rural-urban migrants: a Chinese case study," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(6), pages 741-752.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:6:p:741-752
    DOI: 10.1080/000368498325444
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hawke, A., 1991. "Male-Female Wage Differentials: How Important is Occupational Segragation? ," CEPR Discussion Papers 256, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
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    1. repec:pit:wpaper:338 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Magnani, Elisabetta & Zhu, Rong, 2012. "Gender wage differentials among rural–urban migrants in China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 779-793.
    3. Su, Biwei & Heshmati, Almas, 2011. "Analysis of Gender Wage Differential in China's Urban Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 6252, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo & Yu, Qiumei, 2007. "Decomposition of Changes in Earnings Inequality in China: A Distributional Approach," MPRA Paper 3806, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo, 2014. "Trends in China’s gender employment and pay gap: Estimating gender pay gaps with employment selection," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 708-725.
    6. Lin Xiu & Morley Gunderson, 2015. "Occupational segregation and the gender earnings gap in China: devils in the details," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(5), pages 711-732, August.
    7. Xiaohua Li & Yaohui Zhao & Lili Lu, 2008. "Effects of Education on Earnings Inequality in Urban China: 1988-2003," Working Papers PMMA 2008-09, PEP-PMMA.
    8. Biwei Su & Almas Heshmati, 2013. "Analysis Of The Determinants Of Income And Income Gap Between Urban And Rural China," China Economic Policy Review (CEPR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 2(01), pages 1-29.
    9. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo, 2008. "Glass ceiling or sticky floor? Examining the gender earnings differential across the earnings distribution in urban China, 1987-2004," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 243-263, June.
    10. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo, 2007. "Glass Ceiling or Sticky Floor? Examining the Gender Pay Gap across the Wage Distribution in Urban China, 1987-2004," MPRA Paper 3544, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Ma, Xinxin & Li, Shi, 2016. "Industrial Segregation and Wage Gaps between Migrants and Local Urban Residents in China:2002-2013," CEI Working Paper Series 2016-4, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

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