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Occupational Segregation and Its Impact on Gender Wage Discrimination in China's Rural Industrial Sector

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  • Meng, Xin
  • Miller, Paul

Abstract

This paper examines gender wage discrimination in China's newly developed rural industrial sector. The different occupational distributions of men and women are shown to be partly due to discrimination in occupational assignment by the community authorities, but the impact on the gender wage differential of this form of discrimination is not as important as wage discrimination within each occupation. Moreover, it is found that relative to intraoccupational discrimination, interoccupational wage discrimination is more important than in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia. Possible explanations for these phenomena are provided. Copyright 1995 by Royal Economic Society.

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  • Meng, Xin & Miller, Paul, 1995. "Occupational Segregation and Its Impact on Gender Wage Discrimination in China's Rural Industrial Sector," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 136-155, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:47:y:1995:i:1:p:136-55
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    2. Miller, Paul W, 1987. "The Wage Effect of the Occupational Segregation of Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388), pages 885-896, December.
    3. Hawke, A., 1991. "Male-Female Wage Differentials: How Important is Occupational Segragation? ," CEPR Discussion Papers 256, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    4. McFadden, Daniel, 1974. "The measurement of urban travel demand," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 303-328, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yi Chen & Sylvie Démurger & Martin Fournier, 2006. "The Evolution of Gender Eamings Gaps and Discrimination in Urban China : 1988-1995," Post-Print hal-00081928, HAL.
    2. Jean-Louis Arcand & Béatrice D'hombres, 2004. "Racial discrimination in the Brazilian labour market: wage, employment and segregation effects," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(8), pages 1053-1066.
    3. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Tan, Michelle, 2011. "Noncognitive skills, occupational attainment, and relative wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-13, January.
    4. Castro Campos, Bente, 2013. "Human capital differences or labor market discrimination? The occupational outcomes of ethnic minorities in rural Guizhou (China)," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Transition Economies, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), volume 73, number 73.
    5. Lin Xiu & Morley Gunderson, 2015. "Occupational segregation and the gender earnings gap in China: devils in the details," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(5), pages 711-732, August.
    6. Gagnon, Jason & Xenogiani, Theodora & Xing, Chunbing, 2009. "Are all migrants really worse off in urban labour markets: new empirical evidence from China," MPRA Paper 16109, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo, 2014. "Trends in China’s gender employment and pay gap: Estimating gender pay gaps with employment selection," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 708-725.
    8. Ana C. Dammert & Beyza Ural Marchand, 2015. "Privatization In China: Technology And Gender In The Manufacturing Sector," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(2), pages 250-264, April.
    9. Sylvie Dmurger & Martin Fournier & Li Shi & Wei Zhong, 2006. "Economic Liberalization with Rising Segmentation in China's Urban Labor Market," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 5(3), pages 58-101, Fall.
    10. Ge, Yuhao & Li, Hongbin & Zhang, Junsen, 2011. "Gender earnings gaps in Hong Kong: Empirical evidence from across the earnings distribution in 2006," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 151-164, March.
    11. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo, 2008. "Glass ceiling or sticky floor? Examining the gender earnings differential across the earnings distribution in urban China, 1987-2004," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 243-263, June.
    12. Liu, Pak-Wai & Zhang, Junsen & Chong, Shu-Chuen, 2004. "Occupational segregation and wage differentials between natives and immigrants: evidence from Hong Kong," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 395-413, February.
    13. Hare, Denise, 1999. "Women's Economic Status in Rural China: Household Contributions to Male-Female Disparities in the Wage-Labor Market," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1011-1029, June.
    14. Newell, Andrew & Reilly, Barry, 1996. "The gender wage gap in Russia: Some empirical evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 337-356, October.
    15. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo, 2007. "Glass Ceiling or Sticky Floor? Examining the Gender Pay Gap across the Wage Distribution in Urban China, 1987-2004," MPRA Paper 3544, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Andrén, Daniela & Andrén, Thomas, 2007. "Occupational Gender Composition and Wages in Romania: From Planned Equality to Market Inequality?," IZA Discussion Papers 3152, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Chen, Zhihong & Ge, Ying & Lai, Huiwen & Wan, Chi, 2013. "Globalization and Gender Wage Inequality in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 256-266.
    18. Joy, Lois, 2006. "Occupational differences between recent male and female college graduates," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 221-231, April.
    19. Martyna Kobus, 2014. "Multidimensional polarization for ordinal data," Working Papers 326, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    20. Sylvie DÉMURGER & Martin FOURNIER & Yi CHEN, 2007. "The Evolution Of Gender Earnings Gaps And Discrimination In Urban China, 1988-95," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 45(1), pages 97-121.
    21. Shi Li & Jin Song, 2011. "Changes in the Gender Wage Gap in Urban China, 1995-2007," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 201120, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    22. Jairo Guillermo Isaza Castro, 2014. "Occupational segregation, selection effects and gender wage differences: evidence from urban Colombia," REVISTA APUNTES DEL CENES, UNIVERSIDAD PEDAGOGICA Y TECNOLOGICA DE COLOMBIA, June.
    23. Raquel Vale Mendes, 2005. "Occupational segregation and the Portuguese gender wage gap," ERSA conference papers ersa05p130, European Regional Science Association.
    24. repec:eee:joreco:v:29:y:2016:i:c:p:31-39 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Ham, Roger & Junankar, Pramod N. (Raja) & Wells, Robert, 2009. "Occupational Choice: Personality Matters," IZA Discussion Papers 4105, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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