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Education, Intelligence, and Well-Being: Evidence from a Semiparametric Latent Variable Transformation Model for Multiple Outcomes of Mixed Types

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Listed:
  • Ling Zhou
  • Huazhen Lin
  • Yi-Chen Lin

Abstract

This paper uses a semiparametric latent variable transformation model for multiple outcomes to examine the effect of education and maternal education on female multidimensional well-being and proposes a procedure to build a well-being index that is less susceptible to functional form misspecification. We model multidimensional well-being as an unobserved common factor underlying the observed well-being outcomes. The semiparametric methodology allows us to alleviate misspecification bias by combining multiple indicators into a latent construct in an unspecified, data-driven way. Using data from female participants of the 1974–2010 waves of the US General Social Survey, we find that education, intelligence, and maternal education contribute positively to multidimensional well-being. However, the effects of education and maternal education on female multidimensional well-being declined steadily between the mid-1970s and the 1990s, and have not rebounded since. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Ling Zhou & Huazhen Lin & Yi-Chen Lin, 2016. "Education, Intelligence, and Well-Being: Evidence from a Semiparametric Latent Variable Transformation Model for Multiple Outcomes of Mixed Types," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(3), pages 1011-1033, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:125:y:2016:i:3:p:1011-1033
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-015-0865-1
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Well-being; Education; Intelligence; Maternal education; Latent variable model; Semiparametric method; I25; I31;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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