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Czy konkurencja determinuje wielkość inwestycji gmin miejskich w Polsce?

Listed author(s):
  • Grażyna Bukowska
  • Joanna Siwińska
Registered author(s):

    Celem artykułu jest identyfikacja determinant inwestycji, ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem zmiennych dotyczących poziomu konkurencji politycznej oraz zmiennych mierzących samodzielność dochodową samorządów, która traktowana jest jako przybliżenie siły konkurencji pomiędzy ośrodkami lokalnymi, na podstawie danych z 304 gmin miejskich w Polsce z lat 2002-2014. W badaniu udowodniono istotną ujemną zależność między inwestycjami per capita (udział inwestycji w wydatkach ogółem) i poziomem politycznej konkurencji mierzonej indeksem Herfindahla-Hirschmann (HHI). Wzrost politycznej koncentracji (czyli mniejsza konkurencja) sprzyjał wzrostowi inwestycji publicznych na mieszkańca. Ponadto wykazano, że inwestycje są zależne od poziomu decentralizacji fiskalnej. Wyniki sugerują, że wzrost decentralizacji zwiększa udział środków publicznych przeznaczonych na inwestycje.

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    Article provided by Warsaw School of Economics in its journal Gospodarka Narodowa.

    Volume (Year): (2016)
    Issue (Month): 6 ()
    Pages: 95-114

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    Handle: RePEc:sgh:gosnar:y:2016:i:6:p:95-114
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