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Suggestions for a Covid-19 Post-Pandemic Research Agenda in Environmental Economics

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Listed:
  • Robert J. R. Elliott

    () (Birmingham University)

  • Ingmar Schumacher

    () (IPAG Business School)

  • Cees Withagen

    () (Department of Spatial Economics Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

Abstract

In this article we draw upon early lessons from the 2020 Covid-19 crisis and discuss how these may relate to a future research agenda in environmental economics. In particular, we describe how the events surrounding the Covid-19 crisis may inform environmental research related to globalization and cooperation, the green transition, pricing carbon externalities, as well as the role of uncertainty and timing of policy inventions. We also discuss the implications for future empirical research in this area.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert J. R. Elliott & Ingmar Schumacher & Cees Withagen, 2020. "Suggestions for a Covid-19 Post-Pandemic Research Agenda in Environmental Economics," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 76(4), pages 1187-1213, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:76:y:2020:i:4:d:10.1007_s10640-020-00478-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-020-00478-1
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