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The employment cycles of neighboring cities

  • Wall, Howard J.

This paper examines the spatial interaction of neighboring cities over their employment cycles. Neighboring cities, which are large and closely integrated cities within the same metro area, tend to have relatively similar employment cycles. However, this is largely because they tend to be in the same state, not because they are neighbors. Depending on differences in size, density, and human capital, neighborness usually means that cities have relatively dissimilar employment cycles. I attribute this result to the tendency for cities within the same metro area to specialize according to function and human capital.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Regional Science and Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 43 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 177-185

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Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:43:y:2013:i:1:p:177-185
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