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Did The New Economy Vanquish The Regional Business Cycle?

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  • Mark D. Partridge
  • Dan S. Rickman

Abstract

The record economic expansion of the 1990s has led many to speculate that the United States is experiencing a New Economy. Along with the belief that strong growth could continue without accelerating inflation, there has been speculation that regional disparities in economic performance are disappearing in the New Economy. The historical patterns of state labor market performance are compared with recent trends to assess whether the 1990s represent a departure from the past. The conclusion is that regional disparities continue to exist. If anything, many of the historical patterns are stronger today than in the 1970s and 1980s. Copyright 2002 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2002. "Did The New Economy Vanquish The Regional Business Cycle?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(4), pages 456-469, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:20:y:2002:i:4:p:456-469
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Breandán Ã'hUallacháin, 2008. "Regional growth transition clubs in the United States," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 87(1), pages 33-53, March.
    2. Golub, Alla A. & Henderson, Jason R. & Foster, Kenneth A., 2004. "Does Rural Job Growth Lead The Economy Out Of Recession?," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20066, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Dan S. Rickman & Mouhcine Guettabi, 2015. "The Great Recession And Nonmetropolitan America," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 93-112, January.
    4. Wall, Howard J., 2013. "The employment cycles of neighboring cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 177-185.
    5. Andres Rodríguez-Pose & Ugo Fratesi, 2003. "Regional economic cycles and the emergence of sheltered economies in the periphery of the EU," ERSA conference papers ersa03p189, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Maureen Kilkenny & Mark D. Partridge, 2009. "Export Sectors and Rural Development," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 910-929.

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