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Do federal reserve bank presidents have a regional bias?

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  • Jung, Alexander
  • Latsos, Sophia

Abstract

This paper examines whether the monetary policy deliberations of the FOMC have been influenced by regional considerations. We explain individual interest rate preferences by district, and use real-time data to estimate Taylor-type rules (sample 1990 to 2008). In line with the literature, this paper confirms that regional variables are explanatory factors of the interest rate preferences of most Reserve Bank Presidents. A new finding is that only few Reserve Bank Presidents display a regional bias in their interest rate preferences. Given their nature and size, these biases did not impede on the Fed's capacity to set interest rates with a nationwide focus.

Suggested Citation

  • Jung, Alexander & Latsos, Sophia, 2015. "Do federal reserve bank presidents have a regional bias?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 40(PA), pages 173-183.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:40:y:2015:i:pa:p:173-183
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2015.06.004
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    Cited by:

    1. Jung, Alexander, 2016. "Have minutes helped to predict fed funds rate changes?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 18-32.
    2. Sylvester Eijffinger & Ronald Mahieu & Louis Raes, 2016. "Monetary Policy Committees, Voting Behavior and Ideal Points," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1628, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    3. Jung, Alexander, 2016. "Have FOMC minutes helped markets to predict FED funds rate changes?," Working Paper Series 1961, European Central Bank.
    4. Jung, Alexander & Latsos, Sophia, 2015. "Do federal reserve bank presidents have a regional bias?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 40(PA), pages 173-183.
    5. Pavel Gertler & Roman Horvath, 2017. "Market Reading of Central Bankers Words. A High-Frequency Evidence," Working and Discussion Papers WP 2/2017, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.
    6. Favaretto, Federico & Masciandaro, Donato, 2016. "Doves, hawks and pigeons: Behavioral monetary policy and interest rate inertia," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 50-58.
    7. repec:eee:finsta:v:36:y:2018:i:c:p:336-345 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eee:poleco:v:53:y:2018:i:c:p:120-133 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. El-Shagi, Makram & Jung, Alexander, 2015. "Does the Greenspan era provide evidence on leadership in the FOMC?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 173-190.
    10. Hamza Bennani & Tobias Kranz & Matthias Neuenkirch, 2017. "Disagreement Between the FOMC and the Fed's Staff: New Insights Based on a Counterfactual Interest Rate," Research Papers in Economics 2017-10, University of Trier, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Individual Taylor-type rules; Regional bias; Real-time data; Interest rate preferences;

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C30 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - General
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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