IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Implementing COOL: Comparative welfare effects of different labeling schemes

  • Joseph, Siny
  • Lavoie, Nathalie
  • Caswell, Julie A.

Country-of-origin labeling (COOL) is being implemented in different forms and degrees in the United States and other countries across the world. The first implementation of mandatory country of origin labeling (MCOOL) in the United States was for seafood in 2005. This is an example of partial MCOOL because it exempts the foodservice sector and excludes processed seafood from labeling. Using a conceptual framework, we analyze the welfare impacts of partial MCOOL when compared to no, voluntary, and total mandatory COOL, taking into account imperfect competition in the downstream markets, information asymmetry, and diversion of low-quality product to the unlabeled market. The model is general enough to apply to any incomplete regulation for which the perceived low-quality product is required to be labeled, such as the labeling of genetically modified food in the European Union. Our results show that when consumers have a strong enough preference for domestic relative to imported product, regulators can overestimate the gain in consumer welfare from partial mandatory labeling if they ignore the diversion of lower quality imports to the unlabeled sector. We show that if the preference for domestic product is large enough, total MCOOL benefits the home market the most overall, including domestic consumers and producers, but not the imperfectly competitive downstream agents. However, if total MCOOL is too costly to implement, partial MCOOL is the second-best solution, but only if consumers falsely believe the unlabeled product to be of higher quality than it truly is. Our results suggest more research is needed to determine the extent to which consumers value the information provided by MCOOL and to enable regulators to consider the welfare impact of diversion in evaluating incomplete mandatory labeling regulations.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306919213001565
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

Volume (Year): 44 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 14-25

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:44:y:2014:i:c:p:14-25
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Murray Fulton & Konstantinos Giannakas, 2004. "Inserting GM Products into the Food Chain: The Market and Welfare Effects of Different Labeling and Regulatory Regimes," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 42-60.
  2. Plastina, Alejandro S. & Giannakas, Konstantinos, 2007. "Market And Welfare Effects Of Mandatory Country-Of-Origin Labeling In The Us Specialty Crops Sector," 2007 Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland, Oregon TN 9735, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Saak, Alexander, 2011. "A model of labeling with horizontal differentiation and cost variability:," IFPRI discussion papers 1075, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Fred Kuchler & Barry Krissoff & David Harvey, 2010. "Do Consumers Respond to Country-of-Origin Labelling?," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 323-337, December.
  5. Giannakas, Konstantinos & Fulton, Murray, 2002. "Consumption effects of genetic modification: what if consumers are right?," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 27(2), August.
  6. Allshouse, Jane E. & Buzby, Jean C. & Harvey, David J. & Zorn, David, 2004. "Seafood Safety and Trade," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33779, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  7. Awada, Lana & Yiannaka, Amalia, 2012. "Consumer perceptions and the effects of country of origin labeling on purchasing decisions and welfare," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 21-30.
  8. Jayson L. Lusk & Jason Brown & Tyler Mark & Idlir Proseku & Rachel Thompson & Jody Welsh, 2006. "Consumer Behavior, Public Policy, and Country-of-Origin Labeling," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 28(2), pages 284-292.
  9. Zago, Angelo M. & Pick, Daniel H., 2004. "Labeling Policies in Food Markets: Private Incentives, Public Intervention, and Welfare Effects," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(01), April.
  10. Lusk Jayson L. & Marette St├ęphan, 2012. "Can Labeling and Information Policies Harm Consumers?," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-15, October.
  11. Jones, Keithly G. & Somwaru, Agapi & Whitaker, James B., 2009. "Country of Origin Labeling: Evaluating the Impacts on U.S. and World Markets," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 38(3), December.
  12. Mennecke, Brian & Townsend, Anthony & Hayes, Dermot J. & Lonergan, Steven, 2006. "A Study of the Factors That Influence Consumer Attitudes Toward Beef Products Using the Conjoint Market Analysis Tool," Staff General Research Papers 12650, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  13. Lusk, Jayson L. & Anderson, John D., 2004. "Effects of Country-of-Origin Labeling on Meat Producers and Consumers," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(02), August.
  14. Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Marette, Stephan & Schiavina, Alessandra, 1998. "Non-tariff Trade Barriers and Consumers' Information: The Case of the EU-US Trade Dispute over Beef," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 437-62.
  15. James Rude & Javed Iqbal & Derek Brewin, 2006. "This Little Piggy Went to Market with a Passport: The Impacts of U.S. Country of Origin Labeling on the Canadian Pork Sector," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 54(3), pages 401-420, 09.
  16. Ward, Ruby A. & Bailey, DeeVon & Jensen, Robert T., 2005. "An American BSE Crisis: Has it affected the Value of Traceability and Country-of-Origin Certifications for US and Canadian Beef?," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 8(02).
  17. Chung, Chanjin & Zhang, Tong & Peel, Derrell S., 2009. "Effects of Country of Origin Labeling in the U.S. Meat Industry with Imperfectly Competitive Processors," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 38(3), December.
  18. Umberger, Wendy J. & Feuz, Dillon M. & Calkins, Chris R. & Sitz, Bethany M., 2003. "Country-Of-Origin Labeling Of Beef Products: U.S. Consumers' Perceptions," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 34(03), November.
  19. Giannakas, Konstantinos & Fulton, Murray, 2002. "Consumption effects of genetic modification: what if consumers are right?," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 27(2), pages 97-109, August.
  20. Johnecheck, Wendy A. & Wilde, Parke E. & Caswell, Julie A., 2010. "Market and Welfare Impacts of COOL on the U.S.-Mexican Tomato Trade," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 35(3), December.
  21. Meredith L. Fowlie, 2009. "Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 72-112, August.
  22. Mussa, Michael & Rosen, Sherwin, 1978. "Monopoly and product quality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 301-317, August.
  23. Loureiro, Maria L. & Umberger, Wendy J., 2007. "A choice experiment model for beef: What US consumer responses tell us about relative preferences for food safety, country-of-origin labeling and traceability," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 496-514, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:44:y:2014:i:c:p:14-25. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.