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Assessing the economic costs of a foot and mouth disease outbreak on Brittany: A dynamic computable general equilibrium analysis

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  • Gohin, Alexandre
  • Rault, Arnaud

Abstract

Outbreaks of animal diseases such as foot and mouth disease (FMD) are of great concern for agriculture. In this paper, we quantify the potential dynamic impacts of such a disease on Brittany, a French region with an important livestock sector. In order to do this, we develop a dynamic computable general equilibrium model that allows us to measure the impacts on the livestock sectors and downstream food industries. We study the impacts of a FMD outbreak including the culling infected animals, a temporary decline in demand, and restrictions on movements of live animals and meats during the FMD outbreak period.

Suggested Citation

  • Gohin, Alexandre & Rault, Arnaud, 2013. "Assessing the economic costs of a foot and mouth disease outbreak on Brittany: A dynamic computable general equilibrium analysis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 97-107.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:39:y:2013:i:c:p:97-107
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2013.01.003
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    Keywords

    Dynamics; CGE; Animal disease; Catastrophic event;

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