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Incompetency training: Theory, practice, and remedies

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  • Woodside, Arch G.

Abstract

“Incompetency training” includes formal and informal instruction that consciously (purposively) or unconsciously imparts knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behavior (including procedures) that are useless, inaccurate, misleading, and/or will lower performance outcomes of the trainee versus no training or training using alternative training methods. “Imparts” in the definition refers to exposing a trainee to incompetency training; such exposure is not a guarantee that the training increases the trainee's incompetence. This editorial is to stimulate research interest among scholars in incompetency training theory, evidence, and the efficacy of remedies. The editorial offers an early workbench model of incompetency training theory. The theory includes the proposition that executives and associates in firms, academia, and government organizations consciously as well as unknowingly offer incompetency training in many contexts. Increasing trainees' vigilance and ability to recognize exposure to incompetency-training may help trainees to decrease the effectiveness (impact) of exposures to incompetency training—advancing incompetency training theory and knowledge of incompetency training practice may be necessary conditions for remedying negative outcomes that follow from trainees receiving such training. Available evidence supports the first proposition and, to a limited extent, the second proposition.

Suggested Citation

  • Woodside, Arch G., 2012. "Incompetency training: Theory, practice, and remedies," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 65(3), pages 279-293.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:65:y:2012:i:3:p:279-293 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2011.10.025
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    Cited by:

    1. de Villiers, Rouxelle & Woodside, Arch G. & Marshall, Roger, 2016. "Making tough decisions competently: Assessing the value of product portfolio planning methods, devil’s advocacy, group discussion, weighting priorities, and evidenced-based information," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 2849-2862.
    2. Huarng, Kun-Huang & Yu, Tiffany Hui-Kuang, 2015. "Healthcare expenditure with causal recipes," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 1570-1573.
    3. Arch G. Woodside & Arnoldo R. Camacho & Lai, Wen-Hsiang, 2013. "Guest Editorial: Sense Making, Dilemmas, and Solutions in Strategic Management," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, pages 91-95.
    4. Albort-Morant, Gema & Oghazi, Pejvak, 2016. "How useful are incubators for new entrepreneurs?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 2125-2129.
    5. Lyon, Aidan & Wintle, Bonnie C. & Burgman, Mark, 2015. "Collective wisdom: Methods of confidence interval aggregation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 1759-1767.
    6. Loock, Moritz & Hinnen, Gieri, 2015. "Heuristics in organizations: A review and a research agenda," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 2027-2036.
    7. Hartmann, Nathaniel N. & Rutherford, Brian N. & Park, JungKun, 2017. "Sequencing of multi-faceted job satisfaction across business-to-business and business-to-consumer salespeople: A multi-group analysis," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 153-159.
    8. Dai, Chien-Yun & Huang, Duen-Huang, 2015. "Causal complexities to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial instruction," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 894-899.

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