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Heterogeneous beliefs and local information in stochastic fictitious play

  • Fudenberg, Drew
  • Takahashi, Satoru

Stochastic fictitious play (SFP) assumes that agents do not try to influence the future play of their current opponents, an assumption that is justified by appeal to a setting with a large population of players who are randomly matched to play the game. However, the dynamics of SFP have only been analyzed in models where all agents in a player role have the same beliefs. We analyze the dynamics of SFP in settings where there is a population of agents who observe only outcomes in their own matches and thus have heterogeneous beliefs. We provide conditions that ensure that the system converges to a state with homogeneous beliefs, and that its asymptotic behavior is the same as with a single representative agent in each player role.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Games and Economic Behavior.

Volume (Year): 71 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 100-120

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Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:71:y:2011:i:1:p:100-120
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622836

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