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Regionally-varying and regionally-uniform electricity pricing policies compared across four usage categories

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  • Cho, Seong-Hoon
  • Kim, Taeyoung
  • Kim, Hyun Jae
  • Park, Kihyun
  • Roberts, Roland K.

Abstract

The objective of our research is to predict how electricity demand varies spatially between status quo regionally-uniform electricity pricing and hypothetical regionally-varying electricity pricing across usage categories. We summarize the empirical results of a case study of electricity demand in South Korea with three key findings and their related implications. First, the price elasticities of electricity demand differ across usage categories. Specifically, electricity demands for manufacturing and retail uses are price inelastic and close to unit elastic, respectively, while those for agricultural and residential uses are not statistically significant. This information is important in designing energy policy, because higher electricity prices could reduce electricity demands for manufacturing and retail uses, resulting in slower growth in those sectors. Second, spatial spillovers in electricity demand vary across uses. Understanding the spatial structure of electricity demand provides useful information to energy policy makers for anticipating changes in demand across regions via regionally-varying electricity pricing for different uses. Third, simulation results suggest that spatial variations among electricity demands by usage category under a regionally-varying electricity-pricing policy differ from those under a regionally-uniform electricity-pricing policy. Differences in spatial changes between the policies provide information for developing a realistic regionally-varying electricity-pricing policy according to usage category.

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  • Cho, Seong-Hoon & Kim, Taeyoung & Kim, Hyun Jae & Park, Kihyun & Roberts, Roland K., 2015. "Regionally-varying and regionally-uniform electricity pricing policies compared across four usage categories," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 182-191.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:49:y:2015:i:c:p:182-191
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2015.02.009
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Elasticities of electricity demand; Regionally-varying electricity pricing; Spatial spillovers;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • N75 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Asia including Middle East

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