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A Partial Adjustment Model of U.S. Electricity Demand by Region, Season, and Sector

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  • Paul, Anthony

    () (Resources for the Future)

  • Myers, Erica

    () (Resources for the Future)

  • Palmer, Karen

    () (Resources for the Future)

Abstract

Identifying the factors that influence electricity demand in the continental United States and mathematically characterizing them are important for developing electricity consumption projections. The price elasticity of demand is especially important, since the electricity price effects of policy implementation can be substantial and the demand response to policy-induced changes in prices can significantly affect the cost of policy compliance. This paper estimates electricity demand functions with particular attention paid to the demand stickiness that is imposed by the capital-intensive nature of electricity consumption and to regional, seasonal, and sectoral variation. The analysis uses a partial adjustment model of electricity demand that is estimated in a fixed-effects OLS framework. This model formulation allows for the price elasticity to be expressed in both its short-run and long-run forms. Price elasticities are found to be broadly consistent with the existing literature, but with important regional, seasonal, and sectoral differences.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul, Anthony & Myers, Erica & Palmer, Karen, 2009. "A Partial Adjustment Model of U.S. Electricity Demand by Region, Season, and Sector," Discussion Papers dp-08-50, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-08-50
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    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/RFF-DP-08-50.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hung, Ming-Feng & Huang, Tai-Hsin, 2015. "Dynamic demand for residential electricity in Taiwan under seasonality and increasing-block pricing," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 168-177.
    2. Blázquez Gomez, Leticia M. & Filippini, Massimo & Heimsch, Fabian, 2013. "Regional impact of changes in disposable income on Spanish electricity demand: A spatial econometric analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(S1), pages 58-66.
    3. Alberini, Anna & Gans, Will & Velez-Lopez, Daniel, 2011. "Residential consumption of gas and electricity in the U.S.: The role of prices and income," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 870-881, September.
    4. Fell, Harrison & Li, Shanjun & Paul, Anthony, 2010. "A New Look at Residential Electricity Demand Using Household Expenditure Data," Discussion Papers dp-10-57, Resources For the Future.
    5. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Kim, Taeyoung & Kim, Hyun Jae & Park, Kihyun & Roberts, Roland K., 2015. "Regionally-varying and regionally-uniform electricity pricing policies compared across four usage categories," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 182-191.
    6. Fell, Harrison & Linn, Joshua, 2013. "Renewable electricity policies, heterogeneity, and cost effectiveness," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 688-707.
    7. repec:eee:energy:v:144:y:2018:i:c:p:627-632 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Saunoris, James W. & Sheridan, Brandon J., 2013. "The dynamics of sectoral electricity demand for a panel of US states: New evidence on the consumption–growth nexus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 327-336.
    9. Okajima, Shigeharu & Okajima, Hiroko, 2013. "Estimation of Japanese price elasticities of residential electricity demand, 1990–2007," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 433-440.
    10. Mark Miller & Anna Alberini, 2015. "Sensitivity of price elasticity of demand to aggregation, unobserved heterogeneity, price trends, and price endogeneity: Evidence from U.S. Data," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 15/223, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    11. Gautam, Tej & Paudel, Krishna, 2016. "The Demand For Electricity And Natural Gas In The Northeastern United States," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230114, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    12. repec:eee:energy:v:140:y:2017:i:p1:p:601-611 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Labandeira, Xavier & Labeaga, José M. & López-Otero, Xiral, 2012. "Estimation of elasticity price of electricity with incomplete information," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 627-633.
    14. Wichsinee Wibulpolprasert, 2016. "Optimal Environmental Policies and Renewable Energy Investment in Electricity Markets," PIER Discussion Papers 47, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Nov 2016.
    15. Massimo Filippini & Bettina Hirl & Giuliano Masiero, 2015. "Rational habits in residential electricity demand," IdEP Economic Papers 1506, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
    16. Kwon, Sanguk & Cho, Seong-Hoon & Roberts, Roland K. & Kim, Hyun Jae & Park, Kihyun & Edward Yu, T., 2016. "Effects of electricity-price policy on electricity demand and manufacturing output," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 324-334.
    17. Alberini, Anna & Filippini, Massimo, 2011. "Response of residential electricity demand to price: The effect of measurement error," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 889-895, September.
    18. Blazquez Leticia & Nina Boogen & Massimo Filippini, 2012. "Residential electricity demand for Spain: new empirical evidence using aggregated data," CEPE Working paper series 12-82, CEPE Center for Energy Policy and Economics, ETH Zurich.
    19. Kwon, Sanguk & Cho, Seong-Hoon & Roberts, Roland Keith & Kim, Taeyoung & Yu, T. Edward, 2015. "Effects of changes in electricity price on electricity demand and resulting effects on manufacturing output," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196850, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    20. Pye, Steve & Usher, Will & Strachan, Neil, 2014. "The uncertain but critical role of demand reduction in meeting long-term energy decarbonisation targets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 575-586.
    21. Kwon, Sanguk & Cho, Seong-Hoon & Roberts, Roland K. & Kim, Hyun Jae & Park, KiHyun & Edward Yu, Tun-Hsiang, 2016. "Short-run and the long-run effects of electricity price on electricity intensity across regions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 372-382.
    22. Matthew Ranson & Lauren Morris & Alex Kats-Rubin, 2014. "Climate Change and Space Heating Energy Demand: A Review of the Literature," NCEE Working Paper Series 201407, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Dec 2014.
    23. Tatyana Deryugina & Alexander MacKay & Julian Reif, 2017. "The Long-Run Dynamics of Electricity Demand: Evidence from Municipal Aggregation," NBER Working Papers 23483, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Blázquez, Leticia & Boogen, Nina & Filippini, Massimo, 2013. "Residential electricity demand in Spain: New empirical evidence using aggregate data," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 648-657.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    electricity; demand elasticities; energy demand; partial adjustment;

    JEL classification:

    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities

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