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A pseudo-panel data model of household electricity demand

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  • Bernard, Jean-Thomas
  • Bolduc, Denis
  • Yameogo, Nadège-Désirée

Abstract

We study the dynamic behaviour of household electricity consumption on the basis of four large independent surveys conducted in the province of Québec from 1989 to 2002. The latter region displays some rather unique features such as the very extensive use of electricity for space heating in a cold climate and the wide range of energy sources used to meet space heating requirements. We adopt Deaton (1985) approach to create 25 cohorts of households that form a pseudo-panel. The cohorts have on average 131 households. The model error terms allow for group heteroskedasticity and serial correlation. Short-run and long-run own and cross-price elasticities are statistically significant. Electricity and natural gas are estimated to be substitutes while electricity and fuel oil are complements, as it may occur in the Quebec context. The estimate of the income elasticity is not significant. Comparisons with related studies are provided.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernard, Jean-Thomas & Bolduc, Denis & Yameogo, Nadège-Désirée, 2011. "A pseudo-panel data model of household electricity demand," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 315-325, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:33:y:2011:i:1:p:315-325
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