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The price elasticity of electricity demand in South Australia

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  • Shu Fan

    ()

  • Rob Hyndman

    ()

Abstract

In this paper, the price elasticity of electricity demand, representing the sensitivity of customer demand to the price of electricity, has been estimated for South Australia. We first undertake a review of the scholarly literature regarding electricity price elasticity for different regions and systems. Then we perform an empirical evaluation of the historic South Australian price elasticity, focussing on the relationship between price and demand quantiles at each half-hour of the day. This work attempts to determine whether there is any variation in price sensitivity with the time of day or quantile, and to estimate the form of any relationship that might exist in South Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Shu Fan & Rob Hyndman, 2010. "The price elasticity of electricity demand in South Australia," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 16/10, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:msh:ebswps:2010-16
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    File URL: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/ebs/pubs/wpapers/2010/wp16-10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Faruqui, Ahmad & George, Stephen, 2005. "Quantifying Customer Response to Dynamic Pricing," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 53-63, May.
    2. Aubin, Christophe, et al, 1995. "Real-Time Pricing of Electricity for Residential Customers: Econometric Analysis of an Experiment," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(S), pages 171-191, Suppl. De.
    3. Espey, James A. & Espey, Molly, 2004. "Turning on the Lights: A Meta-Analysis of Residential Electricity Demand Elasticities," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-17, April.
    4. Massimo Filippini, 1999. "Swiss residential demand for electricity," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(8), pages 533-538.
    5. Robert H. Patrick & Frank A. Wolak, 2001. "Estimating the Customer-Level Demand for Electricity Under Real-Time Market Prices," NBER Working Papers 8213, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Rob J Hyndman & Shu Fan, 2008. "Density forecasting for long-term peak electricity demand," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 6/08, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    7. Ramanathan, Ramu & Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive W. J. & Vahid-Araghi, Farshid & Brace, Casey, 1997. "Shorte-run forecasts of electricity loads and peaks," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 161-174, June.
    8. Beenstock, Michael & Goldin, Ephraim & Nabot, Dan, 1999. "The demand for electricity in Israel," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 168-183, April.
    9. Thomas Taylor & Peter Schwarz & James Cochell, 2005. "24/7 Hourly Response to Electricity Real-Time Pricing with up to Eight Summers of Experience," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 235-262, January.
    10. Hansen, Bruce E, 2002. "Tests for Parameter Instability in Regressions with I(1) Processes," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 45-59, January.
    11. Peter C. Reiss & Matthew W. White, 2005. "Household Electricity Demand, Revisited," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(3), pages 853-883.
    12. Filippini, Massimo, 1995. "Electricity demand by time of use An application of the household AIDS model," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 197-204, July.
    13. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell, 2005. "The residential demand for electricity in Australia: an application of the bounds testing approach to cointegration," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 467-474, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Electricity demand; Price elasticity;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models

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