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Household Energy Expenditure and Income Groups: Evidence from Great Britain


  • Jamasb, T.
  • Meier, H.


The residential demand for energy has been growing steadily in tact with the societies’ increasing economic affluence. As a result, the household sector accounts for a significant share of total energy use and economic welfare in modern economies. The residential energy demand is expected to continue to grow in the foreseeable future. This has, in recent years, attracted much attention mainly in relation to the debate on the effect of energy use on climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Jamasb, T. & Meier, H., 2010. "Household Energy Expenditure and Income Groups: Evidence from Great Britain," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1011, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:1011

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    Cited by:

    1. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Kim, Taeyoung & Kim, Hyun Jae & Park, Kihyun & Roberts, Roland K., 2015. "Regionally-varying and regionally-uniform electricity pricing policies compared across four usage categories," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 182-191.
    2. Curtis, John & Pentecost, Anne, 2014. "Changes in Household Fuel Expenditure Associated with Improvements in Building Energy Efficiency," Papers WP478, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Ozge Gokdemir, 2015. "Consumption, savings and life satisfaction: the Turkish case," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 62(2), pages 183-196, June.
    4. Yanan Liu & Yixuan Gao & Yu Hao & Hua Liao, 2016. "The Relationship between Residential Electricity Consumption and Income: A Piecewise Linear Model with Panel Data," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(10), pages 1-11, October.
    5. Rodriguez-Oreggia, Eduardo & Yepez-Garcia, Rigoberto Ariel, 2014. "Income and energy consumption in Mexican households," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6864, The World Bank.
    6. Hache, Emmanuel & Leboullenger, Déborah & Mignon, Valérie, 2017. "Beyond average energy consumption in the French residential housing market: A household classification approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 82-95.
    7. Romero-Jordán, Desiderio & del Río, Pablo & Peñasco, Cristina, 2016. "An analysis of the welfare and distributive implications of factors influencing household electricity consumption," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 361-370.
    8. Rodríguez-Álvarez, A. & Orea, L. & Jamasb, T., 2016. "Fuel poverty and well-being: a consmer theory and stochastic fronteir approach," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1668, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    9. Massimo Florio, 2014. "Energy Reforms and Consumer Prices in the EU over twenty Years," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).
    10. Granqvist, Harry & Grover, David, 2016. "Distributive fairness in paying for clean energy infrastructure," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 87-97.
    11. repec:rfh:bbejor:v:6:y:2017:i:3:p:117-129 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Chancel, Lucas, 2014. "Are younger generations higher carbon emitters than their elders?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 195-207.
    13. Peter A. Groothuis & Tanga McDaniel Mohr, 2014. "Do Consumers Want Smart Meters? Incentives or Inertia: Evidence from North Carolina and Lessons for Policy," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).

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