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Beyond average energy consumption in the French residential housing market: A household classification approach

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  • Hache, Emmanuel
  • Leboullenger, Déborah
  • Mignon, Valérie

Abstract

In a new environment marked by the growing importance of Green House Gas emissions, fuel poverty, and energy efficiency in the different national agendas, the comprehension of energy demand factors appears to be crucial for the effectiveness of energy policies. We consider the latter could be improved by targeting specific household groups rather than looking to follow a single energy consumption level target. This article explores the scope of having a disaggregated energy consumption market to design policies aimed at curbing residential energy consumption or lowering its carbon intensity. Using a clustering method based on the CHAID (Chi Square Automatic Interaction Detection) methodology, we find that the different levels of energy consumption in the French residential sector are related to socio-economic, dwelling and regional characteristics. Then, we build a typology of energy-consuming households where targeted groups (fuel poor, high income and high consuming households) are clearly and separately identified through a simple and transparent set of characteristics. This classification represents an efficient tool for energy efficiency programs and energy poverty policies, but also for potential investors, which could provide specific and tailor made financial tools for the different consumer groups. Furthermore, our approach helps designing some energy efficiency score that could reduce the rebound effect uncertainty for each identified household group.

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  • Hache, Emmanuel & Leboullenger, Déborah & Mignon, Valérie, 2017. "Beyond average energy consumption in the French residential housing market: A household classification approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 82-95.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:107:y:2017:i:c:p:82-95
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.04.038
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    Cited by:

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    2. Dorothée Charlier & Sondès Kahouli, 2018. "Fuel poverty and residential energy demand: how fuel-poor households react to energy price fluctuations," Post-Print halshs-01957771, HAL.
    3. Salomé Bakaloglou and Dorothée Charlier, 2019. "Energy Consumption in the French Residential Sector: How Much do Individual Preferences Matter?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    4. Scarpellini, Sabina & Alexia Sanz Hernández, M. & Moneva, José M. & Portillo-Tarragona, Pilar & Rodríguez, María Esther López, 2019. "Measurement of spatial socioeconomic impact of energy poverty," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 320-331.
    5. Dorothee Charlier and Sondes Kahouli, 2019. "From Residential Energy Demand to Fuel Poverty: Income-induced Non-linearities in the Reactions of Households to Energy Price Fluctuations," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    6. Florian Fizaine & Sondès Kahouli, 2018. "On the power of indicators: how the choice of the fuel poverty measure affects the identification of the target population," Policy Papers 2018.01, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy consumption; Residential sector; Clustering method; France;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis

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