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Gender differences in overconfidence and risk taking: Do self-selection and socialization matter?

Author

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  • Hardies, Kris
  • Breesch, Diane
  • Branson, Joël

Abstract

In a large-scale laboratory experiment, we investigate gender differences in overconfidence and risk taking. Our results show that (self-)selection and socialization can eliminate the gender difference in overconfidence, but they appear insufficient to create environments in which women are as risk loving as men.

Suggested Citation

  • Hardies, Kris & Breesch, Diane & Branson, Joël, 2013. "Gender differences in overconfidence and risk taking: Do self-selection and socialization matter?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 442-444.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:118:y:2013:i:3:p:442-444
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2012.12.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nekby, Lena & Thoursie, Peter Skogman & Vahtrik, Lars, 2008. "Gender and self-selection into a competitive environment: Are women more overconfident than men?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 405-407, September.
    2. Bertrand, Marianne, 2011. "New Perspectives on Gender," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    3. Daniel J. Benjamin & James J. Choi & A. Joshua Strickland, 2010. "Social Identity and Preferences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(4), pages 1913-1928, September.
    4. Cipriani, Giam Pietro & Lubian, Diego & Zago, Angelo, 2009. "Natural born economists?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 455-468, June.
    5. Joseph Henrich & Steve J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan, 2010. "The Weirdest People in the World?," Working Paper Series of the German Council for Social and Economic Data 139, German Council for Social and Economic Data (RatSWD).
    6. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-474, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vanessa Mertins & Wolfgang Hoffeld, 2013. "Do Overconfident Workers Cooperate Less? The Relationship between Overconfidence and Cooperation in Team Production," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201313, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender differences; Risk taking; Overconfidence; Self-selection; Socialization;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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