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Gender and altruism in a random sample

Author

Listed:
  • Boschini, Anne

    () (SOFI)

  • Dreber, Anna

    () (Stockholm School of Economics)

  • von Essen, Emma

    () (Aarhus University)

  • Muren, Astri

    () (Dept. of Economics, Stockholm University)

  • Ranehill, Eva

    () (University of Gothenburg)

Abstract

We study gender differences in altruism in a large random sample of the Swedish population using a standard dictator game. Beside a baseline treatment we have a priming treatment (where participants are reminded of their gender) and two treatments with known male and female counterpart respectively. Significant gender differences arise only in the priming treatment. An exploratory analysis of the effect of interviewer gender indicates that priming effects occur only in gender-mixed contexts.

Suggested Citation

  • Boschini, Anne & Dreber, Anna & von Essen, Emma & Muren, Astri & Ranehill, Eva, 2015. "Gender and altruism in a random sample," Research Papers in Economics 2015:7, Stockholm University, Department of Economics, revised 29 Jan 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sunrpe:2015_0007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alain Cohn & Michel André Maréchal, 2016. "Priming in economics," ECON - Working Papers 226, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender differences; Random sample; Dictator game; Experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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