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Eliciting donor preferences

  • Frode Alfnes
  • Maren Bachke
  • Mette Wik

Most charity organizations depend on contributions from the general public, but little research is conducted on donor preferences. Do donors have geographical, recipient, or thematic preferences? We designed a conjoint analysis experiment in which people rated development aid projects by donating money in dictator games. We find that our sample show strong age, gender, regional, and thematic preferences. Furthermore, we find significant differences between segments. The differences in donations are consistent with differences in donors' attitudes toward development aid and their beliefs about differences in poverty and vulnerability of the recipients. The method here used for development projects can easily be adapted to elicit preferences for other kinds of projects that rely on gifts from private donors.

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Paper provided by The Field Experiments Website in its series Artefactual Field Experiments with number 00098.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:feb:artefa:00098
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.fieldexperiments.com

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  1. Christoph Engel, 2010. "Dictator Games: A Meta Study," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2010_07, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods, revised Jan 2011.
  2. Anthony B. Atkinson & Peter G. Backus & John Micklewright & Cathy Pharoah & Sylke V. Schnepf, 2011. "Charitable Giving for Overseas Development: UK trends over a quarter century," DoQSS Working Papers 11-07, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
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