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Natural born economists?

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  • Cipriani, Giam Pietro
  • Lubian, Diego
  • Zago, Angelo

Abstract

We carried out a survey among a large group of undergraduate students of different disciplines to test whether the study of economics influences students' view on profit maximization and the market mechanism. We find that there are significant differences between economics students and the others, suggesting the presence of both a selection bias against the market system in non economics students and a treatment effect in economics students.

Suggested Citation

  • Cipriani, Giam Pietro & Lubian, Diego & Zago, Angelo, 2009. "Natural born economists?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 455-468, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:30:y:2009:i:3:p:455-468
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Libman & Joachim Zweynert, 2014. "Ceremonial Science: The State of Russian Economics Seen Through the Lens of the Work of ‘Doctor of Science’ Candidates," Working Papers 337, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    2. Hamza Bennani, 2015. "Dissecting the brains of central bankers: The case of the ECB’s Governing Council members on reforms," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 141, pages 97-114.
    3. René Ruske, 2015. "Does Economics Make Politicians Corrupt? Empirical Evidence from the United States Congress," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 240-254, May.
    4. Ruske René & Suttner Johannes, 2012. "Wie (un-)fair sind Ökonomen? – Neue empirische Evidenz zur Marktbewertung und Rationalität / How (un-)fair are economists? New empirical evidence on market valuation and rationality," ORDO. Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, De Gruyter, vol. 63(1), pages 179-194, January.
    5. Dries Berings & Stef Adriaenssens, 2012. "The Role of Business Ethics, Personality, Work Values and Gender in Vocational Interests from Adolescents," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 106(3), pages 325-335, March.
    6. İbrahim Erdem SEÇİLMİŞ, 2014. "Seniority: A Blessing or A Curse? The Effect of Economics Training on the Perception of Distributive Justice," Sosyoekonomi Journal, Sosyoekonomi Society, issue 22(22).
    7. Vanessa Mertins & Susanne Warning, 2013. "Gender Differences in Responsiveness to a Homo Economicus Prime in the Gift-Exchange Game," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201309, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    8. Isabel Busom & Cristina Lopez-Mayan, 2015. "Student Preconceptions and Learning Economic Reasoning," Working Papers 862, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    9. Amélie Goossens & Pierre-Guillaume Méon, 2010. "The impact of studying economics, and other disciplines, on the belief that voluntary exchange makes everyone better off," Working Papers CEB 10-012.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    10. Libman, Alexander & Zweynert, Joachim, 2014. "Ceremonial science: The state of Russian economics seen through the lens of the work of ‘Doctor of Science’ candidates," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 360-378.
    11. Joshua Farley, 2016. "The foundations for an ecological economy: an overview," Chapters,in: Beyond Uneconomic Growth, chapter 1, pages 3-21 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Paul Dalziel, 2011. "Schumpeter's 'Vision' and the Teaching of Principles of Economics to Resource Students," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 10(2), pages 63-74.
    13. Amélie Goossens & Pierre-Guillaume Méon, 2015. "The Belief that Market Transactions Are Mutually Beneficial: A Comparison of the Views of Students in Economics and Other Disciplines," Post-Print CEB 2013/162215, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    14. Suttner, Johannes R., 2014. "Sensitivity of economists during market allocation," CIW Discussion Papers 3/2014, University of Münster, Center for Interdisciplinary Economics (CIW).
    15. Haucap, Justus & Müller, Andrea, 2014. "Why are economists so different? Nature, nurture, and gender effects in a simple trust game," DICE Discussion Papers 136, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    16. Joshua Farley, 2014. "Seeking Consilience for Sustainability Science:Â Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, and the New Economics," Challenges in Sustainability, Librello publishing house, vol. 2(1), pages 1-17.
    17. Green, Tom L., 2013. "Teaching (un)sustainability? University sustainability commitments and student experiences of introductory economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 135-142.
    18. Hardies, Kris & Breesch, Diane & Branson, Joël, 2013. "Gender differences in overconfidence and risk taking: Do self-selection and socialization matter?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(3), pages 442-444.
    19. Michał Krawczyk, 2011. "Greed vs. Love of Science in Young Economists A Field Experiment," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 25.
    20. repec:zbw:uwhdps:232011 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Barile, Lory & Cullis, John & Jones, Philip, 2015. "Will one size fit all? Incentives designed to nurture prosocial behaviour," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 9-16.
    22. Ruske, René & Suttner, Johannes, 2012. "Wie (un-)fair sind Ökonomen? Neue empirische Evidenz zur Marktbewertung und Rationalität," CIW Discussion Papers 03/2012, University of Münster, Center for Interdisciplinary Economics (CIW).
    23. Sauerland, Dirk, 2012. "Zur Beziehung von Akzeptanz, Gerechtigkeit und Leistungsfähigkeit der sozialen Marktwirtschaft," Wittener Diskussionspapiere zu alten und neuen Fragen der Wirtschaftswissenschaft 23/2012, Witten/Herdecke University, Faculty of Management and Economics.
    24. Cullis, John & Jones, Philip & Savoia, Antonio, 2012. "Social norms and tax compliance: Framing the decision to pay tax," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 159-168.

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