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University dropouts in Italy: Are supply side characteristics part of the problem?

Author

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  • Gitto, Lara
  • Minervini, Leo Fulvio
  • Monaco, Luisa

Abstract

High student dropout rates are a long-standing issue in Italian universities. University dropouts may be explained by supply side characteristics of universities as well as by students’ individual characteristics, but studies of dropouts in Italy have focused on the latter group of characteristics. Our econometric analysis focuses on single universities as units of analysis and employs Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research data covering seven years from 2001 to 2008. Several models were used for estimations: fixed effects vs random effects models, and generalized least squares models corrected for heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation within panels. The results show that some supply side factors have a significant impact on the probability of dropout occurring, especially when considering the organizational aspects of Italian universities. So, for instance, acting on the structure of university courses and reorganizing remote branches might reduce the number of dropouts.

Suggested Citation

  • Gitto, Lara & Minervini, Leo Fulvio & Monaco, Luisa, 2016. "University dropouts in Italy: Are supply side characteristics part of the problem?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 108-116.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecanpo:v:49:y:2016:i:c:p:108-116
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eap.2015.12.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paul Clarke & Claire Crawford & Fiona Steele & Anna Vignoles, 2010. "The Choice between fixed and random effects models: some considerations for educational research," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/240, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
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    Cited by:

    1. Donggeun Kim & Seoyong Kim, 2018. "Sustainable Education: Analyzing the Determinants of University Student Dropout by Nonlinear Panel Data Models," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(4), pages 1-18, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Italian universities; Dropouts; FE and RE models; GLS model; Heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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