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The impact of aging out of WIC on food security in households with children

Author

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  • Arteaga, Irma
  • Heflin, Colleen
  • Gable, Sara

Abstract

Correlational research suggests that disadvantaged families with young children who are food insecure often participate in the Women Infants and Children program (WIC). While there has been a considerable amount of research on the association between WIC participation and food insecurity, these studies have reported mixed findings and do not explore the effects of WIC at a critical age, when children turn five years old. This paper estimates the effects of aging out of WIC on rates of household food insecurity using the exogenous rule that children are eligible for the WIC program until the day before they turn 61months old. Using a regression discontinuity design and the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth-cohort dataset, we find that there is an increase in rates of food insecurity for children who become age-ineligible for WIC (i.e., reach 61months of age) and who have not yet started kindergarten. Furthermore, this effect is robust under different models, bandwidths and analytic samples.

Suggested Citation

  • Arteaga, Irma & Heflin, Colleen & Gable, Sara, 2016. "The impact of aging out of WIC on food security in households with children," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 82-96.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:69:y:2016:i:c:p:82-96
    DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.07.015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arteaga, Irma & Heflin, Colleen, 2014. "Participation in the National School Lunch Program and food security: An analysis of transitions into kindergarten," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(P3), pages 224-230.
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    7. Nord, Mark & Coleman-Jensen, Alisha & Gregory, Christian, 2014. "Prevalence of U.S. Food Insecurity Is Related to Changes in Unemployment, Inflation, and the Price of Food," Economic Research Report 262213, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    9. Marianne P. Bitler & Janet Currie, 2005. "Does WIC work? The effects of WIC on pregnancy and birth outcomes," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 73-91.
    10. Lee, Bong Joo & Mackey-Bilaver, Lucy, 2007. "Effects of WIC and Food Stamp Program participation on child outcomes," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 501-517, April.
    11. Hahn, Jinyong & Todd, Petra & Van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2001. "Identification and Estimation of Treatment Effects with a Regression-Discontinuity Design," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(1), pages 201-209, January.
    12. Brent Kreider & John V. Pepper & Manan Roy, 2016. "Identifying the Effects of WIC on Food Insecurity Among Infants and Children," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1106-1122, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Valizadeh, Pourya & Smith, Travis A., 2018. "Distributional Impacts of WIC on Dietary Quality of Children: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 273904, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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