IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jecsur/v28y2014i5p862-888.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Demand, Customer Base-Line And Demand Response In The Electricity Market: A Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Almas Heshmati

Abstract

The increasing use of demand-side management, as a tool to reliably meet electricity demands at peak time, has stimulated interest among researchers, consumers and producer organiza-tions, managers, regulators and policymakers. This research reviews the growing literature on models which are used to study demand, customer base-line (CBL) and demand response in the electricity market. After characterizing the general demand models, the CBL, based on which the demand response models are studied, is reviewed. Given the experience gained from the review and existing conditions, the study combines an appropriate model for each case for a possible application to the electricity market; moreover, it discusses the implications of the results. In the literature, these aspects are studied independently. The main contribution of this survey is attributed to the treatment of the three issues as sequentially interdependent. The review is expected to enhance the understanding of the demand, CBL and demand response in the electricity market and their relationships. The objective is conducted through a combination of demand and supply side managements in order to reduce demand through different demand response programs during peak times. This enables electricity suppliers to save costly electricity generation and at the same time reduce energy vulnerability.

Suggested Citation

  • Almas Heshmati, 2014. "Demand, Customer Base-Line And Demand Response In The Electricity Market: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 862-888, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:28:y:2014:i:5:p:862-888
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/joes.12033
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dergiades, Theologos & Tsoulfidis, Lefteris, 2008. "Estimating residential demand for electricity in the United States, 1965-2006," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2722-2730, September.
    2. Ozturk, Ilhan, 2010. "A literature survey on energy-growth nexus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 340-349, January.
    3. Faruqui, Ahmad & George, Stephen, 2005. "Quantifying Customer Response to Dynamic Pricing," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 53-63, May.
    4. Kucukali, Serhat, 2010. "Comments on "Energy demand estimation of South Korea using artificial neural network" by Zong Woo Geem and William E. Roper," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 6379-6380, October.
    5. Murata, Akinobu & Kondou, Yasuhiko & Hailin, Mu & Weisheng, Zhou, 2008. "Electricity demand in the Chinese urban household-sector," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 85(12), pages 1113-1125, December.
    6. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2011. "Electricity demand elasticities and temperature: Evidence from panel smooth transition regression with instrumental variable approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 896-902, September.
    7. Pedro Linares & Xavier Labandeira, 2010. "Energy Efficiency: Economics And Policy," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(3), pages 573-592, July.
    8. Ek, Kristina & Söderholm, Patrik, 2008. "Households' switching behavior between electricity suppliers in Sweden," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 254-261, December.
    9. Christensen, Laurits R & Jorgenson, Dale W & Lau, Lawrence J, 1973. "Transcendental Logarithmic Production Frontiers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 55(1), pages 28-45, February.
    10. Torriti, Jacopo & Hassan, Mohamed G. & Leach, Matthew, 2010. "Demand response experience in Europe: Policies, programmes and implementation," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1575-1583.
    11. Mideksa, Torben K. & Kallbekken, Steffen, 2010. "The impact of climate change on the electricity market: A review," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 3579-3585, July.
    12. Geem, Zong Woo & Roper, William E., 2009. "Energy demand estimation of South Korea using artificial neural network," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 4049-4054, October.
    13. Cappers, Peter & Goldman, Charles & Kathan, David, 2010. "Demand response in U.S. electricity markets: Empirical evidence," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1526-1535.
    14. Allcott, Hunt, 2011. "Rethinking real-time electricity pricing," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 820-842.
    15. Alberini, Anna & Gans, Will & Velez-Lopez, Daniel, 2011. "Residential consumption of gas and electricity in the U.S.: The role of prices and income," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 870-881, September.
    16. Zibelman, Audrey & Krapels, Edward N., 2008. "Deployment of Demand Response as a Real-Time Resource in Organized Markets," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 51-56, June.
    17. Chao, Hung-po, 2010. "Price-Responsive Demand Management for a Smart Grid World," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 7-20, January.
    18. Strbac, Goran, 2008. "Demand side management: Benefits and challenges," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(12), pages 4419-4426, December.
    19. Frank A. Wolak, 2011. "Do Residential Customers Respond to Hourly Prices? Evidence from a Dynamic Pricing Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 83-87, May.
    20. Alberto Cavaliere & Simona Scabrosetti, 2008. "Privatization And Efficiency: From Principals And Agents To Political Economy," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(4), pages 685-710, September.
    21. Shin, Jeong-Shik, 1985. "Perception of Price When Price Information Is Costly: Evidence from Residential Electricity Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(4), pages 591-598, November.
    22. Orans, Ren & Woo, C.K. & Horii, Brian & Chait, Michele & DeBenedictis, Andrew, 2010. "Electricity Pricing for Conservation and Load Shifting," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 7-14, April.
    23. Anin Aroonruengsawat & Maximilian Auffhammer, 2011. "Impacts of Climate Change on Residential Electricity Consumption: Evidence from Billing Data," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 311-342 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Spees, Kathleen & Lave, Lester B., 2007. "Demand Response and Electricity Market Efficiency," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 69-85, April.
    25. Tanaka, Makoto, 2006. "Real-time pricing with ramping costs: A new approach to managing a steep change in electricity demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(18), pages 3634-3643, December.
    26. Yoo, Seung-Hoon & Lee, Joo Suk & Kwak, Seung-Jun, 2007. "Estimation of residential electricity demand function in Seoul by correction for sample selection bias," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5702-5707, November.
    27. Andrew C. Worthington & Mark Hoffman, 2008. "An Empirical Survey Of Residential Water Demand Modelling," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(5), pages 842-871, December.
    28. Louw, Kate & Conradie, Beatrice & Howells, Mark & Dekenah, Marcus, 2008. "Determinants of electricity demand for newly electrified low-income African households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 2814-2820, August.
    29. Massimo, Filippini, 2011. "Short- and long-run time-of-use price elasticities in Swiss residential electricity demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 5811-5817, October.
    30. Dilaver, Zafer & Hunt, Lester C., 2011. "Industrial electricity demand for Turkey: A structural time series analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 426-436, May.
    31. Fan, Shu & Hyndman, Rob J., 2011. "The price elasticity of electricity demand in South Australia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3709-3719, June.
    32. Berry, David, 2008. "The impact of energy efficiency programs on the growth of electricity sales," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 3620-3625, September.
    33. Leuthold, Florian & Weigt, Hannes & von Hirschhausen, Christian, 2008. "Efficient pricing for European electricity networks - The theory of nodal pricing applied to feeding-in wind in Germany," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 284-291, December.
    34. Sylvestre Gaudin & Ronald C. Griffin & Robin C. Sickles, 2001. "Demand Specification for Municipal Water Management: Evaluation of the Stone-Geary Form," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(3), pages 399-422.
    35. Frank T. Denton & Dean C. Mountain & Byron G. Spencer, 2003. "Energy Demand with Declining Rate Schedules: An Econometric Model for the U.S. Commercial Sector," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(1), pages 86-105.
    36. Herter, Karen & McAuliffe, Patrick & Rosenfeld, Arthur, 2007. "An exploratory analysis of California residential customer response to critical peak pricing of electricity," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 25-34.
    37. Herter, Karen, 2007. "Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 2121-2130, April.
    38. Ozturk, Ilhan & Acaravci, Ali, 2011. "Electricity consumption and real GDP causality nexus: Evidence from ARDL bounds testing approach for 11 MENA countries," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(8), pages 2885-2892, August.
    39. Azzouni, Anees S. & Parmesano, Hethie & Al-Rashed, Saud A., 2008. "Major Electricity Customer Pricing Options: The Case of Saudi Arabia," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 55-69.
    40. Ziramba, Emmanuel, 2008. "The demand for residential electricity in South Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 3460-3466, September.
    41. Ananth V. Iyer & Vinayak Deshpande & Zhengping Wu, 2003. "A Postponement Model for Demand Management," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(8), pages 983-1002, August.
    42. Asadoorian, Malcolm O. & Eckaus, Richard S. & Schlosser, C. Adam, 2008. "Modeling climate feedbacks to electricity demand: The case of China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1577-1602, July.
    43. Payne, James E., 2010. "A survey of the electricity consumption-growth literature," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 87(3), pages 723-731, March.
    44. Peter C. Reiss & Matthew W. White, 2005. "Household Electricity Demand, Revisited," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(3), pages 853-883.
    45. John A. Nordin, 1976. "A Proposed Modification of Taylor's Demand Analysis: Comment," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 7(2), pages 719-721, Autumn.
    46. Lester D. Taylor, 1975. "The Demand for Electricity: A Survey," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 6(1), pages 74-110, Spring.
    47. Koichiro Ito, 2014. "Do Consumers Respond to Marginal or Average Price? Evidence from Nonlinear Electricity Pricing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(2), pages 537-563, February.
    48. Lee, Byoung-Hoon & Ahn, Hyeon-Hyo, 2006. "Electricity industry restructuring revisited: the case of Korea," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1115-1126, July.
    49. Sheffrin, Anjali & Yoshimura, Henry & LaPlante, David & Neenan, Bernard, 2008. "Harnessing the Power of Demand," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 39-50, March.
    50. Kim, Jin-Ho & Shcherbakova, Anastasia, 2011. "Common failures of demand response," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 873-880.
    51. Jamil, Faisal & Ahmad, Eatzaz, 2011. "Income and price elasticities of electricity demand: Aggregate and sector-wise analyses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5519-5527, September.
    52. Winkler, Harald & Simões, André Felipe & Rovere, Emilio Lèbre la & Alam, Mozaharul & Rahman, Atiq & Mwakasonda, Stanford, 2011. "Access and Affordability of Electricity in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 1037-1050, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Heshmati, Almas & Kumbhakar, Subal C. & Sun, Kai, 2014. "Estimation of productivity in Korean electric power plants: A semiparametric smooth coefficient model," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 491-500.
    2. repec:eee:appene:v:216:y:2018:i:c:p:296-310 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Niels Framroze Møller & Laura Mørch Andersen & Lars Gårn Hansen & Carsten Lynge Jensen, 2018. "Can pecuniary and environmental incentives via SMS messaging make households adjust their intra-day electricity demand to a fluctuating production?," IFRO Working Paper 2018/06, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    4. Heshmati, Almas, 2015. "A Review of the Circular Economy and its Implementation," IZA Discussion Papers 9611, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Genc, Talat S., 2016. "Measuring demand responses to wholesale electricity prices using market power indices," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 247-260.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:28:y:2014:i:5:p:862-888. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0950-0804 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.