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The demand for residential electricity in South Africa

  • Ziramba, Emmanuel

This paper examines the residential demand for electricity in South Africa as a function of real gross domestic product per capita, and the price of electricity during the period 1978-2005. We make use of the bounds testing approach to cointegration within an autoregressive distributed framework, suggested by Pesaran et al. [2001. Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships. Journal of Applied Econometrics 16(3) 289-326]. Following the literature, we use a linear double-logarithmic form using income and price as independent variables in the empirical analysis. In the long run, we find that income is the main determinant of electricity demand, while electricity price is insignificant.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

Volume (Year): 36 (2008)
Issue (Month): 9 (September)
Pages: 3460-3466

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Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:36:y:2008:i:9:p:3460-3466
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  11. Filippini, Massimo & Pachauri, Shonali, 2004. "Elasticities of electricity demand in urban Indian households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 429-436, February.
  12. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell, 2005. "The residential demand for electricity in Australia: an application of the bounds testing approach to cointegration," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 467-474, March.
  13. Yoo, Seung-Hoon & Lee, Joo Suk & Kwak, Seung-Jun, 2007. "Estimation of residential electricity demand function in Seoul by correction for sample selection bias," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5702-5707, November.
  14. Ang, B.W. & Goh, T.N. & Liu, X.Q., 1992. "Residential electricity demand in Singapore," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 37-46.
  15. Charalambos Pattichis, 1999. "Price and income elasticities of disaggregated import demand: results from UECMs and an application," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(9), pages 1061-1071.
  16. Beenstock, Michael & Goldin, Ephraim & Nabot, Dan, 1999. "The demand for electricity in Israel," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 168-183, April.
  17. Al-Faris, Abdul Razak F., 2002. "The demand for electricity in the GCC countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 117-124, January.
  18. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Narayan, Seema, 2005. "Estimating income and price elasticities of imports for Fiji in a cointegration framework," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 423-438, May.
  19. Bose, Ranjan Kumar & Shukla, Megha, 1999. "Elasticities of electricity demand in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 137-146, March.
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