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The demand for electricity in the GCC countries

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  • Al-Faris, Abdul Razak F.

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  • Al-Faris, Abdul Razak F., 2002. "The demand for electricity in the GCC countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 117-124, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:30:y:2002:i:2:p:117-124
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Burney, Nadeem A. & Al-Matrouk, Faisal T., 1996. "Energy conservation in electricity generation: A case study of the electricity and water industry in Kuwait," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1-2), pages 69-79, April.
    2. Ang, B. W., 1988. "Electricity-output ratio and sectoral electricity use The case of East and Southeast Asian developing countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 115-121, April.
    3. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    4. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ziramba, Emmanuel, 2008. "The demand for residential electricity in South Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 3460-3466, September.
    2. Muhammad Arshad Khan & Usman Ahmad, 2008. "Energy Demand in Pakistan: A Disaggregate Analysis," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 47(4), pages 437-455.
    3. Stagnaro, Carlo, 2008. "Europe 2020: an Alternative Proposal," MPRA Paper 48743, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell, 2005. "The residential demand for electricity in Australia: an application of the bounds testing approach to cointegration," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 467-474, March.
    5. BuShehri, Mahmoud A.M. & Wohlgenant, Michael K., 2012. "Measuring the welfare effects of reducing a subsidy on a commodity using micro-models: An application to Kuwait's residential demand for electricity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 419-425.
    6. Noel Alter & Shabib Haider Syed, 2011. "An Empirical Analysis of Electricity Demand in Pakistan," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 1(4), pages 116-139.
    7. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell & Prasad, Arti, 2007. "Electricity consumption in G7 countries: A panel cointegration analysis of residential demand elasticities," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 4485-4494, September.
    8. Galetovic, Alexander & Muñoz, Cristián M., 2011. "Regulated electricity retailing in Chile," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 6453-6465, October.
    9. World Bank, 2011. "A New Slant on Slopes : Measuring the Benefits of Increased Electricity Access in Developing Countries," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2742, The World Bank.
    10. Raphael Espinoza, 2012. "Government Spending, Subsidies and Economic Efficiency in the GCC," OxCarre Working Papers 095, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    11. Bilgili, Faik, 2006. "A Dynamic Approach to Demand for Energy in Turkey," MPRA Paper 24038, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Bhattacharyya, Subhes C. & Timilsina, Govinda R., 2010. "Modelling energy demand of developing countries: Are the specific features adequately captured?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 1979-1990, April.
    13. Amusa, Hammed & Amusa, Kafayat & Mabugu, Ramos, 2009. "Aggregate demand for electricity in South Africa: An analysis using the bounds testing approach to cointegration," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 4167-4175, October.
    14. Inglesi-Lotz, R., 2011. "The evolution of price elasticity of electricity demand in South Africa: A Kalman filter application," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3690-3696, June.
    15. Lijesen, Mark G., 2007. "The real-time price elasticity of electricity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 249-258, March.

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