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Energy Demand with Declining Rate Schedules: An Econometric Model for the U.S. Commercial Sector

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  • Frank T. Denton
  • Dean C. Mountain
  • Byron G. Spencer

Abstract

We specify and estimate a model of the demand for electricity and natural gas in commercial buildings using data from the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey. Although not observed, declining rate schedules are approximated by a downward sloping function fitted to billing data for individual survey units. Marginal prices (rates), temperature variables and a large number of building characteristics are incorporated into the model as explanatory variables. Demand and rate schedule equations constitute a simultaneous system, with prices and quantities jointly determined. The effects on price elasticities of using (endogenous)marginal rather than (exogenous) average prices are estimated to be quite large.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank T. Denton & Dean C. Mountain & Byron G. Spencer, 2003. "Energy Demand with Declining Rate Schedules: An Econometric Model for the U.S. Commercial Sector," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(1), pages 86-105.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:79:y:2003:i:1:p:86-105
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ernst R. Berndt & G. Campbell Watkins, 1977. "Demand for Natural Gas: Residential and Commercial Markets in Ontario and British Columbia," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 10(1), pages 97-111, February.
    2. R. Bruce Billings & Donald E. Agthe, 1980. "Price Elasticities for Water: A Case of Increasing Block Rates," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 56(1), pages 73-84.
    3. Douglas A. Houston, 1982. "Revenue Effects from Changes in a Declining Block Pricing Structure," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 58(3), pages 351-363.
    4. Frank T. Denton & Dean C. Mountain & Byron G. Spencer, 1997. "Energy Use in the Commercial Sector: Estimated Intensities and Costs for Canada Based on US Survey Data," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 337, McMaster University.
    5. Michael L. Nieswiadomy & David J. Molina, 1989. "Comparing Residential Water Demand Estimates under Decreasing and Increasing Block Rates Using Household Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 65(3), pages 280-289.
    6. Michael Parti & Cynthia Parti, 1980. "The Total and Appliance-Specific Conditional Demand for Electricity in the Household Sector," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 11(1), pages 309-321, Spring.
    7. Seonghoon Hong & Richard M. Adams, 1999. "Household Responses to Price Incentives for Recycling: Some Further Evidence," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(4), pages 505-514.
    8. Julie A. Hewitt & W. Michael Hanemann, 1995. "A Discrete/Continuous Choice Approach to Residential Water Demand under Block Rate Pricing," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(2), pages 173-192.
    9. Halvorsen, Robert, 1975. "Residential Demand for Electric Energy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(1), pages 12-18, February.
    10. Alan D. Woodland, 1993. "A Micro-Econometric Analysis of the Industrial Demand for Energy in NSW," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 57-90.
    11. John A. Nordin, 1976. "A Proposed Modification of Taylor's Demand Analysis: Comment," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 7(2), pages 719-721, Autumn.
    12. Lester D. Taylor, 1975. "The Demand for Electricity: A Survey," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 6(1), pages 74-110, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Contreras, Sergio & Smith, Wm. Doyle & Fullerton, Thomas M., Jr., 2010. "U.S. commercial electricity consumption," MPRA Paper 34855, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 22 May 2011.
    2. Yueming Qiu, 2014. "Energy Efficiency and Rebound Effects: An Econometric Analysis of Energy Demand in the Commercial Building Sector," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 59(2), pages 295-335, October.
    3. Heshmati, Almas, 2012. "Survey of Models on Demand, Customer Base-Line and Demand Response and Their Relationships in the Power Market," IZA Discussion Papers 6637, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Almas Heshmati, 2014. "Demand, Customer Base-Line And Demand Response In The Electricity Market: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 862-888, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices

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