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Microeconometric Analysis Of Residential Water Demand

I present a microeconometric model to analyse residential water demand using panel data. Pricing has an increasing-block structure. Database contains individual consumptions from water meters and lacks further information. Permanent income is treated as an unobservable individual effect determining optimal consumption. I also consider a time-varying shock to connect latent and observed demands. The economic setup gives rise to a random effects model with a nonlinear individual effect. I use likelihood-based indirect inference for estimation. I compute price-elasticities and predict the effects of a tariff change. The methodology can be applied to analyse demands of other goods with increasing tariffs.

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Paper provided by CEMFI in its series Working Papers with number wp2008_0803.

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Date of creation: Apr 2008
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Handle: RePEc:cmf:wpaper:wp2008_0803
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  1. Hausman, Jerry A, 1985. "The Econometrics of Nonlinear Budget Sets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1255-82, November.
  2. Joseph Altonji, 2012. "Modeling Earnings Dynamics," 2012 Meeting Papers 1180, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Olmstead, Sheila M. & Michael Hanemann, W. & Stavins, Robert N., 2007. "Water demand under alternative price structures," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 181-198, September.
  4. Fullerton, Don & Gan, Li, 2004. "A simulation-based welfare loss calculation for labor taxes with piecewise-linear budgets," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(11), pages 2339-2359, September.
  5. Peter C. Reiss & Matthew W. White, 2006. "Evaluating Welfare with Nonlinear Prices," NBER Working Papers 12370, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Arjan Ruijs, 2009. "Welfare and Distribution Effects of Water Pricing Policies," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(2), pages 161-182, June.
  7. Hausman, Jerry A., 1979. "The econometrics of labor supply on convex budget sets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 171-174.
  8. Arellano, Manuel, 2003. "Panel Data Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199245291, March.
  9. Mas-Colell, Andreu & Whinston, Michael D. & Green, Jerry R., 1995. "Microeconomic Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195102680, March.
  10. Herriges, Joseph A & King, Kathleen Kuester, 1994. "Residential Demand for Electricity under Inverted Block Rates: Evidence from a Controlled Experiment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(4), pages 419-30, October.
  11. Hanemann, W Michael, 1984. "Discrete-Continuous Models of Consumer Demand," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 541-61, May.
  12. Peter C. Reiss & Matthew W. White, 2005. "Household Electricity Demand, Revisited," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(3), pages 853-883.
  13. G. Burtless & J. A. Hausman, 1977. "The Effect of Taxation on Labor Supply: Evaluating the Gary Negative Income Tax Experiment," Working papers 211, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  14. Julie A. Hewitt & W. Michael Hanemann, 1995. "A Discrete/Continuous Choice Approach to Residential Water Demand under Block Rate Pricing," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(2), pages 173-192.
  15. Maddock, Rodney & Castano, Elkin & Vella, Frank, 1992. "Estimating Electricity Demand: The Cost of Linearising the Budget Constraint," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 350-54, May.
  16. Gourieroux, C. & Monfort, A. & Renault, E., 1992. "Indirect Inference," Papers 92.279, Toulouse - GREMAQ.
  17. Lester D. Taylor, 1975. "The Demand for Electricity: A Survey," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 6(1), pages 74-110, Spring.
  18. Anthony A. Smith, Jr. & Michael Keane, 2004. "Generalized Indirect Inference for Discrete Choice Models," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 512, Econometric Society.
  19. Michael L. Nieswiadomy & David J. Molina, 1989. "Comparing Residential Water Demand Estimates under Decreasing and Increasing Block Rates Using Household Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 65(3), pages 280-289.
  20. Smith, A A, Jr, 1993. "Estimating Nonlinear Time-Series Models Using Simulated Vector Autoregressions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(S), pages S63-84, Suppl. De.
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