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Modeling climate feedbacks to electricity demand: The case of China


  • Asadoorian, Malcolm O.
  • Eckaus, Richard S.
  • Schlosser, C. Adam


This paper is an empirical investigation of the effects of climate on the use of electricity by consumers and producers in urban and rural areas within China. It takes advantage of an unusual combination of temporal and regional data sets in order to estimate temperature, as well as price and income elasticities of electricity demand. The estimated positive temperature/electric power feedback implies a continually increasing use of energy to produce electric power which, in China, is primarily based on coal. In the absence of countervailing measures, this will contribute to increased emissions, increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, and increases in greenhouse warming.

Suggested Citation

  • Asadoorian, Malcolm O. & Eckaus, Richard S. & Schlosser, C. Adam, 2008. "Modeling climate feedbacks to electricity demand: The case of China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1577-1602, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:30:y:2008:i:4:p:1577-1602

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Deschenes, Olivier & Greenstone, Michael, 2004. "The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations in Weather," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt6w7242cj, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
    2. Nordhaus, William D, 1991. "To Slow or Not to Slow: The Economics of the Greenhouse Effect," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(407), pages 920-937, July.
    3. Dubin, Jeffrey A & McFadden, Daniel L, 1984. "An Econometric Analysis of Residential Electric Appliance Holdings and Consumption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 345-362, March.
    4. von Hirschhausen, Christian & Andres, Michael, 2000. "Long-term electricity demand in China -- From quantitative to qualitative growth?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 231-241, April.
    5. Engle, Robert F., 1982. "A general approach to lagrange multiplier model diagnostics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 83-104, October.
    6. Considine, Timothy J., 2000. "The impacts of weather variations on energy demand and carbon emissions," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 295-314, October.
    7. Vaage, Kjell, 2000. "Heating technology and energy use: a discrete/continuous choice approach to Norwegian household energy demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 649-666, December.
    8. repec:reg:rpubli:291 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Zhihua Zhang & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2003. "The System of Equalization Transfers in China," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0312, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    10. Warwick J. McKibbin & Peter J. Wilcoxen, 2002. "The Role of Economics in Climate Change Policy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 107-129, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jing-Li Fan & Bao-Jun Tang & Hao Yu & Yun-Bing Hou & Yi-Ming Wei, 2015. "Impact of climatic factors on monthly electricity consumption of China’s sectors," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 75(2), pages 2027-2037, January.
    2. Moral-Carcedo, Julián & Pérez-García, Julián, 2015. "Temperature effects on firms’ electricity demand: An analysis of sectorial differences in Spain," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 407-425.
    3. Hübler, Michael, 2009. "Energy saving technology diffusion via FDI and trade: a CGE model of China," Kiel Working Papers 1479, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. repec:eee:energy:v:128:y:2017:i:c:p:601-608 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Liu, Ming-Hua & Margaritis, Dimitris & Zhang, Yang, 2013. "Market-driven coal prices and state-administered electricity prices in China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 167-175.
    6. repec:eco:journ2:2017-06-17 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Herrerias, M.J., 2013. "Seasonal anomalies in electricity intensity across Chinese regions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1548-1557.
    8. Xavier Labandeira & José M. Labeaga & Xiral López-Otero, 2011. "Energy Demand for Heating in Spain: An Empirical Analysis with Policy Purposes," Working Papers 06-2011, Economics for Energy.
    9. Michael Hanemann & Xavier Labandeira & José M. Labeaga, 2013. "Energy Demand for Heating: Short Run and Long Run," Working Papers 07-2013, Economics for Energy.
    10. Matthew Ranson & Lauren Morris & Alex Kats-Rubin, 2014. "Climate Change and Space Heating Energy Demand: A Review of the Literature," NCEE Working Paper Series 201407, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Dec 2014.
    11. Inglesi, Roula, 2010. "Aggregate electricity demand in South Africa: Conditional forecasts to 2030," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 197-204, January.
    12. Melissa Dell & Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2013. "What Do We Learn from the Weather? The New Climate-Economy Literature," NBER Working Papers 19578, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Gunnar Eskeland & Torben Mideksa, 2010. "Electricity demand in a changing climate," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 15(8), pages 877-897, December.

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