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Employee Training in Australia: Evidence from AWIRS

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  • FILIPE ALMEIDA‐SANTOS
  • KAREN A. MUMFORD

Abstract

We use linked data for 13 991 employees and 1494 workplaces to analyse the incidence of employer‐provided training in Australia. We find potential experience, current job tenure, low education levels, skilled vocational training and part‐time or fixed‐term employment status are all associated with a lower probability of recent training. In contrast to studies for other countries, we find no evidence of discrimination on the basis of demographic characteristics in the provision of this job‐related training. Finally, and in support of recent non‐competitive training models, higher levels of wage compression are found to be positively related to a greater incidence of employee training.

Suggested Citation

  • Filipe Almeida‐Santos & Karen A. Mumford, 2004. "Employee Training in Australia: Evidence from AWIRS," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(s1), pages 53-64, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:80:y:2004:i:s1:p:s53-s64
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4932.2004.00185.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-4932.2004.00185.x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. C. Jeffrey Waddoups, 2012. "Employer-Sponsored Training and Longer-Tenured Workers: Evidence from A ustralia," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(4), pages 966-986, October.
    2. C. Jeffrey Waddoups, 2014. "Union Membership and Job-Related Training: Incidence, Transferability, and Efficacy," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(4), pages 753-778, December.
    3. Marloes de Graaf-Zijl, 2005. "The Attractiveness of Temporary Employment to Reduce Adjustment Costs," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-121/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    4. Filipe Almeida-Santos & Karen Mumford, 2006. "Employee Training, Wage Dispersion and Equality in Britain," Discussion Papers 06/14, Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. G. Guidetti & G. Pedrini, 2015. "Systemic flexibility and human capital development: the relationship between non-standard employment and workplace training," Working Papers wp1019, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    6. C. Waddoups, 2011. "Firm Size and Work-Related Training: New Evidence on Incidence, Intensity, and Training Type from Australia," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 390-413, December.
    7. Paul H. Jensen, 2010. "Exploring the Uses of Matched Employer–Employee Datasets," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 43(2), pages 209-216, June.

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