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Trade Unions and Family Friendly Policies in Britain

  • John W. Budd

    ()

  • Karen Mumford

    ()

This paper uses linked data on over 1,500 workplaces and 20,000 individuals from the 1998 British Workplace Employee Relations Survey to analyze the relationship between labor unions and the availability of six employer-provided family-friendly policies. Unions appear to help with work-family issues by increasing the availability of parental leave and job sharing options through a combination of negotiating for additional benefits and providing better information about existing policies. There is also a negative association between union membership and the availability of working at home options and, for parents of young children, childcare subsidies.

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File URL: http://www.legacy-irc.csom.umn.edu/RePEC/hrr/papers/0302.pdf
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Paper provided by Human Resources and Labor Studies, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities Campus) in its series Working Papers with number 0302.

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Handle: RePEc:hrr:papers:0302
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  1. Andrew K. G. Hildreth, 2000. "Union Wage Differentials for Covered Members and Nonmembers in Great Britain," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 21(1), pages 133-147, January.
  2. Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2004. "The union membership wage-premium puzzle: Is there a free rider problem?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(3), pages 402-421, April.
  3. Waldfogel, Jane, 1998. "The Family Gap for Young Women in the United States and Britain: Can Maternity Leave Make a Difference?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(3), pages 505-45, July.
  4. Budd, J.W. & Na, I.G., 1994. "The Union Membership Wage Premium for Employees Covered by Collective Bargaining Agreements," Papers 94-09, Minnesota - Industrial Relations Center.
  5. Richard B. Freeman, 1981. "The effect of unionism on fringe benefits," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 34(4), pages 489-509, July.
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