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Firm Size and Work-Related Training: New Evidence on Incidence, Intensity, and Training Type from Australia

  • C. Waddoups

    ()

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12122-011-9118-5
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Labor Research.

Volume (Year): 32 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 390-413

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jlabre:v:32:y:2011:i:4:p:390-413
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  1. Charles Brown & James L. Medoff, 1989. "The Employer Size-Wage Effect," NBER Working Papers 2870, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Dan A. Black & Brett J. Noel & Zheng Wang, 1999. "On-the-Job Training, Establishment Size, and Firm Size: Evidence for Economies of Scale in the Production of Human Capital," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 66(1), pages 82-100, July.
  3. Alison Booth & Pamela Katic, 2008. "Men at Work in a Land Down-under," CEPR Discussion Papers 586, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  4. Francis Green & Stephen Machin & David Wilkinson, 1999. "Trade unions and training practices in British workplaces," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(2), pages 179-195, January.
  5. Daron Acemoglu & Joern-Steffen Pischke, 1998. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labor Markets," Working papers 98-12, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  6. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 9.
  7. Oi, Walter Y. & Idson, Todd L., 1999. "Firm size and wages," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 33, pages 2165-2214 Elsevier.
  8. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
  9. Filipe Almeida-Santos & Karen A. Mumford, 2004. "Employee Training in Australia: Evidence from AWIRS ," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(s1), pages S53-S64, 09.
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