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The more they spend, the more I earn? Firms’ training investments and post-training wages of apprentices

Author

Listed:
  • Hans Dietrich

    (Institute for Employment Research (IAB), Nuremberg)

  • Harald Pfeifer

    (Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training (BIBB), Bonn and Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA))

  • Felix Wenzelmann

    (Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training (BIBB), Bonn)

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the relation between a firm’s training investment and the post-training wages of apprenticeship graduates. For our analysis, we first calculate a training investment indicator using detailed information about firm-level training costs. We then merge the firm-level data with individual-level administrative data on employment and wages of apprenticeship graduates. Using regression models controlling for selection into employment, we find that a firm investment in training relates positively with graduates’ post-training wages. Doubling a firm’s training investment leads to a wage mark-up of about 2.8%. This result is robust to different specifications. However, we find that especially graduates from low-investment firms benefit from a higher training investment. The wage mark-up for graduates from firms with already high investment levels is small and statistically not significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Hans Dietrich & Harald Pfeifer & Felix Wenzelmann, 2016. "The more they spend, the more I earn? Firms’ training investments and post-training wages of apprentices," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0116, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
  • Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0116
    as

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    File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/leadinghouse/0116_lhwpaper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    4. Muehlemann, Samuel & Pfeifer, Harald & Walden, Günter & Wenzelmann, Felix & Wolter, Stefan C., 2010. "The financing of apprenticeship training in the light of labor market regulations," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 799-809, October.
    5. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1999. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 539-572, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Training investment; post-training wages; apprenticeship system;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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