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The Impact of High School Exit Exams on Graduation Rates and Achievement

Author

Listed:
  • Katherine Caves

    () (Department of Business Administration, University of Zurich)

  • Simone Balestra

    () (Department of Business Administration, University of Zurich)

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the long-term effects of high school exit exams (HSEEs)on graduation rates and achievement using an interrupted time series approach.We find that introducing a HSEE has an overall positive effect on graduation rate trends, an effect which is heterogeneous over time. In the year of introduction and the following three years we find a negative impact of HSEE on graduation rates; this negative impact is short-lived and becomes positive over the long term. We perform robustness checks using states that do not have HSEEs as control group. We also estimate a pre-intervention negative effect, suggesting that high schools start preparing for the HSEE before its actual introduction. We find no effects for achievement, possibly due to the lack of meaningful cross-state achievement data in the time period studied.

Suggested Citation

  • Katherine Caves & Simone Balestra, 2014. " The Impact of High School Exit Exams on Graduation Rates and Achievement," Working Papers 346, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zrh:wpaper:346
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    High school exit exams; graduation rates; achievement;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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