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Better Luck Next Time: Learning through Retaking

Author

Listed:
  • Kala Krishna
  • Sergey Lychagin
  • Cemile Yavas
  • Veronica Frisancho

    ()

Abstract

This paper provides some evidence that repeat taking of competitive exams may reduce the impact of background disadvantages on educational outcomes. Using administra- tive data on the university entrance exam in Turkey, the paper estimates cumulative learning between the first and the nth attempt while controlling for selection into re- taking in terms of observed and unobserved characteristics. Large learning gains mea- sured in terms of improvements in the exam scores are found, especially among less advantaged students.

Suggested Citation

  • Kala Krishna & Sergey Lychagin & Cemile Yavas & Veronica Frisancho, 2014. "Better Luck Next Time: Learning through Retaking," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-483, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:idb-wp-483
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jacob L. Vigdor & Charles T. Clotfelter, 2003. "Retaking the SAT," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(1).
    2. Tansel, Aysit, 2012. "Private Tutoring and the Question of Equitable Opportunities in Turkey," IZA Discussion Papers 6626, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Berberoglu, Giray & Tansel, Aysit, 2014. "Does private tutoring increase students’ academic performance? Evidence from Turkey," MPRA Paper 57370, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Tansel, AysIt & Bircan, Fatma, 2006. "Demand for education in Turkey: A tobit analysis of private tutoring expenditures," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 303-313, June.
    5. Jane Cooley Fruehwirth & Salvador Navarro & Yuya Takahashi, 2016. "How the Timing of Grade Retention Affects Outcomes: Identification and Estimation of Time-Varying Treatment Effects," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(4), pages 979-1021.
    6. Heckman, James J. & Navarro, Salvador, 2007. "Dynamic discrete choice and dynamic treatment effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 136(2), pages 341-396, February.
    7. Aysit Tansel & Fatma Bircan, 2005. "Effect of Private Tutoring on University Entrance Examination Performance in Turkey," ERC Working Papers 0504, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Jun 2005.
    8. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
    9. Caner, Asena & Okten, Cagla, 2013. "Higher education in Turkey: Subsidizing the rich or the poor?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 75-92.
    10. Saygin, Perihan Ozge, 2012. "Gender Differences in College Applications: Evidence from the Centralized System in Turkey," Working Papers 12-21, University of Mannheim, Department of Economics.
    11. Verónica C. Frisancho Robles & Kala Krishna, 2012. "Affirmative Action in Higher Education in India: Targeting, Catch Up, and Mismatch," NBER Working Papers 17727, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Caner, Asena & Okten, Cagla, 2010. "Risk and career choice: Evidence from Turkey," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1060-1075, December.
    13. Loury, Linda Datcher & Garman, David, 1993. "Affirmative Action in Higher Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 99-103, May.
    14. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 2001. "The Dynamics of Educational Attainment for Black, Hispanic, and White Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(3), pages 455-499, June.
    15. Peter Arcidiacono & Esteban Aucejo & Ken Spenner, 2012. "What happens after enrollment? An analysis of the time path of racial differences in GPA and major choice," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-24, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Di Paolo, Antonio & Tansel, Aysit, 2017. "Analyzing Wage Differentials by Fields of Study: Evidence from Turkey," GLO Discussion Paper Series 91, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. repec:eee:jeborg:v:145:y:2018:i:c:p:474-494 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dessí, Roberta & Zhao, Xiaojian, 2018. "Overconfidence, stability and investments," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 474-494.
    4. Katherine Caves & Simone Balestra, 2018. "The impact of high school exit exams on graduation rates and achievement," The Journal of Educational Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 111(2), pages 186-200, March.
    5. repec:wly:iecrev:v:59:y:2018:i:2:p:449-477 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kala Krishna & Sergey Lychagin & Veronica Frisancho, 2018. "Retaking In High Stakes Exams: Is Less More?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 59(2), pages 449-477, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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