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Better Luck Next Time: Learning Through Retaking

  • Verónica Frisancho
  • Kala Krishna
  • Sergey Lychagin
  • Cemile Yavas

In this paper we provide some evidence that repeat taking of competitive exams may reduce the impact of background disadvantages on educational outcomes. Using administrative data on the university entrance exam in Turkey we estimate cumulative learning between the first and the nth attempt while controlling for selection into retaking in terms of observed and unobserved characteristics. We find large learning gains measured in terms of improvements in the exam scores, especially among less advantaged students.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w19663.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19663.

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Date of creation: Nov 2013
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Publication status: published as Veronica Frisancho & Kala Krishna & Sergey Lychagin & Cemile Yavas, 2016. "Better luck next time: Learning through retaking," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, vol 125, pages 120-135.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19663
Note: DEV ED LS
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  1. David Card, 2004. "Is the New Immigration Really So Bad?," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0402, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
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  8. Aysit Tansel & Fatma Bircan, 2004. "Effect of Private Tutoring on University Entrance Examination Performance in Turkey," Working Papers 0407, Economic Research Forum, revised Mar 2004.
  9. Berberoglu, Giray & Tansel, Aysit, 2014. "Does Private Tutoring Increase Students' Academic Performance? Evidence from Turkey," IZA Discussion Papers 8343, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  12. Jacob L. Vigdor & Charles T. Clotfelter, 2003. "Retaking the SAT," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(1).
  13. Peter Arcidiacono & Esteban Aucejo & Ken Spenner, 2012. "What happens after enrollment? An analysis of the time path of racial differences in GPA and major choice," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-24, December.
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  15. Saygin, Perihan Ozge, 2012. "Gender Differences in College Applications: Evidence from the Centralized System in Turkey," Working Papers 12-21, University of Mannheim, Department of Economics.
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