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The impacts of minimum competency exam graduation requirements on high school graduation, college attendance and early labor market success

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  • Bishop, John H.
  • Mane, Ferran

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  • Bishop, John H. & Mane, Ferran, 2001. "The impacts of minimum competency exam graduation requirements on high school graduation, college attendance and early labor market success," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 203-222, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:8:y:2001:i:2:p:203-222
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Henry S. Farber & Robert Gibbons, 1996. "Learning and Wage Dynamics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(4), pages 1007-1047.
    2. Murnane, Richard J & Willett, John B & Levy, Frank, 1995. "The Growing Importance of Cognitive Skills in Wage Determination," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 251-266, May.
    3. Bishop, John H. & Moriarty, Joan Y. & Mane, Ferran, 2000. "Diplomas for learning, not seat time: the impacts of New York Regents examinations," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 333-349, October.
    4. Costrell, Robert M, 1994. "A Simple Model of Educational Standards," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 956-971, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maria De Paola & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2008. "A signalling model of school grades: centralized versus decentralized examinations," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0025, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    2. John Bishop & Ferran Mane, 2005. "Raising academic standards and vocational concentrators: Are they better off or worse off?," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 171-187.
    3. Uwe Jirjahn, 2017. "Foreign Ownership and Intra-Firm Union Density in Germany," Research Papers in Economics 2017-09, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
    4. Steve Bradley & Pam Lenton, 2007. "Dropping out of post-compulsory education in the UK: an analysis of determinants and outcomes," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(2), pages 299-328, April.
    5. Piopiunik, Marc & Schwerdt, Guido & Woessmann, Ludger, 2013. "Central school exit exams and labor-market outcomes," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 93-108.
    6. Peter Arcidiacono & Patrick Bayer & Aurel Hizmo, 2010. "Beyond Signaling and Human Capital: Education and the Revelation of Ability," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 76-104, October.
    7. Hall, Caroline, 2016. "Does more general education reduce the risk of future unemployment? Evidence from an expansion of vocational upper secondary education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 251-271.
    8. Aslund, Olof & Grönqvist, Hans & Hall, Caroline & Vlachos, Jonas, 2015. "Education and Criminal Behavior: Insights from an Expansion of Upper Secondary School," IZA Discussion Papers 9374, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Schwerdt, Guido & Woessmann, Ludger, 2017. "The information value of central school exams," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 65-79.
    10. Katherine Caves & Simone Balestra, 2014. "The Impact of High School Exit Exams on Graduation Rates and Achievement," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0123, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    11. Hunt, Karin & Rankin, Neil A. & Schöer, Volker & Nthuli, Miracle & Sebastiao, Claire, 2009. "Blind Admission? The ability of NSC maths to signal competence in university commerce courses as compared to the former SC Higher Grade maths," MPRA Paper 18075, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Donata Bessey & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2008. "Dropping out and revising educational decisions: Evidence from vocational education," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0040, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    13. Hall, Caroline, 2013. "Does more general education reduce the risk of future unemployment? Evidence from labor market experiences during the Great Recession," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2013:10, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    14. Olesya Baker & Kevin Lang, 2013. "The Effect of High School Exit Exams on Graduation, Employment, Wages and Incarceration," NBER Working Papers 19182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Ahn, Tom, 2014. "A regression discontinuity analysis of graduation standards and their impact on students’ academic trajectories," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 64-75.
    16. Maria De Paola & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2010. "A signalling model of school grades under different evaluation systems," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 101(3), pages 199-212, November.
    17. Stefanie Dufaux, 2012. "Assessment for Qualification and Certification in Upper Secondary Education: A Review of Country Practices and Research Evidence," OECD Education Working Papers 83, OECD Publishing.
    18. Thomas S. Dee & Brian A. Jacob, 2006. "Do High School Exit Exams Influence Educational Attainment or Labor Market Performance?," NBER Working Papers 12199, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Bridget Terry Long, 2010. "Dropout Prevention and College Prep," NBER Chapters,in: Targeting Investments in Children: Fighting Poverty When Resources are Limited, pages 249-282 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Maresa, SPRIETSMA, 2006. "Regional school comparison and school choice : how do they relate to student performance ? Evidence from PISA 2003," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2006002, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
    21. Bessey Donata & Backes-Gellner Uschi, 2015. "Staying Within or Leaving the Apprenticeship System? Revisions of Educational Choices in Apprenticeship Training," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(6), pages 539-552, December.

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