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Cross-border Investment, Heterogeneous Workers, and Employment Security – Evidence from Germany

Author

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  • Bachmann, Ronald
  • Baumgarten, Daniel
  • Stiebale, Joel

Abstract

We analyse how foreign direct investment (FDI) affects employment security using administrative micro data for German employees. FDI intensity is measured at the industry level, which enables us to take into account the sum of direct effects at the investing firms as well as indirect effects of FDI that stem from competitive effects, input-output linkages, technology spillovers, and changes in factor prices. We account for both inward and outward FDI, and differentiate these two types of FDI by source and destination region, respectively. We also investigate whether specific worker groups are affected differently by FDI. We find that both inward and outward FDI at the industry level significantly reduce employment security. This is particularly the case for inward FDI coming from the western part of the European Union, as well as for outward FDI going to Central and Eastern Europe. The effects are quantitatively small overall, but sizeable for some worker groups such as old and low-skilled workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Bachmann, Ronald & Baumgarten, Daniel & Stiebale, Joel, 2011. "Cross-border Investment, Heterogeneous Workers, and Employment Security – Evidence from Germany," Ruhr Economic Papers 268, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:268
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jonathan E. Haskel & Sonia C. Pereira & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2007. "Does Inward Foreign Direct Investment Boost the Productivity of Domestic Firms?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 482-496, August.
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    3. Ronald Bachmann & Peggy Bechara, 2019. "The Importance of Two‐Sided Heterogeneity for the Cyclicality of Labour Market Dynamics," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 87(6), pages 794-820, December.
    4. Pär Hansson, 2005. "Skill Upgrading and Production Transfer within Swedish Multinationals," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(4), pages 673-692, December.
    5. Robert C. Feenstra & Gene M. Grossman & Douglas A. Irwin (ed.), 1996. "The Political Economy of Trade Policy: Papers in Honor of Jagdish Bhagwati," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061864, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peters Heiko & Weigert Benjamin, 2013. "Beschäftigungsentwicklung innerhalb deutscher multinationaler Unternehmen während der globalen Rezession 2008/2009 / Employment Changes Within German Multinational Companies During the Global Recessio," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 233(4), pages 505-525, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign direct investment; labour market transitions; duration analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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