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Fifty shades of QE: Conflicts of interest in economic research

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  • Fabo, Brian
  • Jančoková, Martina
  • Kempf, Elisabeth
  • Pástor, Luboš

Abstract

Central banks sometimes evaluate their own policies. To assess the inherent conflict of interest, we compare the research findings of central bank researchers and academic economists regarding the macroeconomic effects of quantitative easing (QE). We find that central bank papers report larger effects of QE on output and inflation. Central bankers are also more likely to report significant effects of QE on output and to use more positive language in the abstract. Central bankers who report larger QE effects on output experience more favorable career outcomes. A survey of central banks reveals substantial involvement of bank management in research production.

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  • Fabo, Brian & Jančoková, Martina & Kempf, Elisabeth & Pástor, Luboš, 2021. "Fifty shades of QE: Conflicts of interest in economic research," IMFS Working Paper Series 147, Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute for Monetary and Financial Stability (IMFS).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:imfswp:147
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Understanding How Central Banks Use Their Balance Sheets: A Critical Categorization
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2021-06-07 11:57:45

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    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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