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Women’S Labor Force Participation And The Dynamics Of Tradition

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  • Moshe Hazan

    (Hebrew University)

  • Yishay D. Maoz

    (University of Haifa)

Abstract

We present a model in which the social norms regarding women’s labor force participation (LFP) differ from the norms concerning men’s. Assuming that these norms depend on past rates of women LFP creates a gradual increase in women LFP.

Suggested Citation

  • Moshe Hazan & Yishay D. Maoz, 2005. "Women’S Labor Force Participation And The Dynamics Of Tradition," Labor and Demography 0507001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0507001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew J. Baker & Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2007. "Marriage, Specialization, and the Gender Division of Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 763-793.
    2. El-Mallakh, Nelly & Maurel, Mathilde & Speciale, Biagio, 2018. "Arab spring protests and women's labor market outcomes: Evidence from the Egyptian revolution," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 656-682.
    3. Matthias Doepke & Moshe Hazan & Yishay D. Maoz, 2015. "The Baby Boom and World War II: A Macroeconomic Analysis," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(3), pages 1031-1073.
    4. Strulik, Holger, 2014. "A mass phenomenon: The social evolution of obesity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 113-125.
    5. Hiller, Victor & Baudin, Thomas, 2016. "Cultural transmission and the evolution of gender roles," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 8-23.
    6. Sauré, Philip & Zoabi, Hosny, 2014. "International trade, the gender wage gap and female labor force participation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 17-33.
    7. Dante Contreras & Agustin Hurtado & M. Francisca Sara, 2012. "La Excepción Chilena y las Percepciones de Género en la Participación Laboral Femenina," Working Papers wp374, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    8. Victor Gay, 2017. "The Legacy of the Missing Men: The Long-Run Impact of World War I on Female Labor Force Participation," 2017 Papers pga905, Job Market Papers.
    9. Wu, Jiabin & Zhang, Hanzhe, 2020. "Preference Evolution in Different Marriage Markets," Working Papers 2020-1, Michigan State University, Department of Economics.
    10. Bertrand, Marianne & Cortes, Patricia & Olivetti, Claudia & Pan, Jessica, 2016. "Social Norms, Labor Market Opportunities, and the Marriage Gap for Skilled Women," CEPR Discussion Papers 11124, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Akyol, Pelin & Okten, Cagla, 2019. "The Role of Culture on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Turkey," IZA Discussion Papers 12620, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Hazan, Moshe & Tsur, Shay, 2019. "Why is Labor Productivity in Israel so Low?," CEPR Discussion Papers 14011, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Hazan, Moshe & Maoz, Yishay D., 2010. "Women's lifetime labor supply and labor market experience," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 2126-2140, October.
    14. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2018. "A Theory of Social Norms, Women's Time Allocation, and Gender Inequality in the Process of Development," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 237, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    15. Basant Kapur, 2005. "Can faster income growth reduce well-being?," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 25(1), pages 155-171, October.
    16. Nelly EL MALLAKH & Mathilde MAUREL & Biagio SPECIALE, 2014. "Women and political change: Evidence from the Egyptian revolution," Working Papers P116, FERDI.
    17. Burak Sencer Atasoy, 2017. "Female Labour Force Participation in Turkey: The Role of Traditionalism," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(4), pages 675-706, August.
    18. Moshe Hazan, 2006. "Longevity and Hours over the Lifetime: Data and Implications," 2006 Meeting Papers 416, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    19. Idil Göksel, 2012. "The Reasons Of Decreasing Trend Of Female Labour Force Participation In Turkey: The Role Of Conservatism," Working Papers 1205, Izmir University of Economics.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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