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La Excepción Chilena y las Percepciones de Género en la Participación Laboral Femenina

  • Dante Contreras
  • Agustin Hurtado
  • M. Francisca Sara

Las mujeres chilenas exhiben una de las tasas de participación laboral más bajas de Latinoamérica, a pesar del crecimiento económico de las últimas décadas y de tener el mayor nivel de escolaridad de la región después de las mujeres cubanas. Este fenómeno es conocido como la Excepción Chilena, y a pesar de su impacto directo en el crecimiento de largo plazo y en los índices de pobreza y desigualdad, existen pocos trabajos que la aborden directamente. En general, la literatura para Chile ha usado variables tradicionales, como edad, escolaridad e ingreso no laboral, para estudiar la decisión de participación laboral de las mujeres. Sin embargo, la división de responsabilidades y roles al interior del hogar crean percepciones sobre del papel de la mujer en la sociedad que también afectan su participación en el mercado del trabajo. Este estudio emplea datos de percepciones de género de la Encuesta Trabajo y Equidad, y un modelo probit para estimar la probabilidad de participación laboral de las mujeres chilenas. Los resultados muestran que las percepciones sobre el rol de la mujer en el cuidado de la casa y de la familia juegan un papel importante en la explicación de la Excepción Chilena.

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File URL: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/uploads/publicacion/5e8f5415ba0473be8f2a9502dd497e288bde2bd8.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Chile, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number wp374.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp374
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/

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