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Comparison Utility in a Growth Model

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  • Carroll, Christopher D
  • Overland, Jody
  • Weil, David N

Abstract

We examine the dynamics of two endogenous-growth models in which agents have comparison utility. In the inward-looking economy, individuals care about how their current consumption compares with their own past consumption. In the outward-looking economy, they care about how their own consumption compares with other people's consumption. In response to a negative shock to capital, saving and growth will temporarily fall in both of the models that we consider but will remain constant in a model with standard preferences. The decline will be smaller in the outward- than in the inward-looking case, but utility will be lower in the former case because of a negative externality. Copyright 1997 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Carroll, Christopher D & Overland, Jody & Weil, David N, 1997. "Comparison Utility in a Growth Model," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(4), pages 339-367, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jecgro:v:2:y:1997:i:4:p:339-67
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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